News & Politics

Wake Forest University Launches 'Leave Patriarchy Behind' Club

(Image Credit: Tyler O'Neil, PJ Media.)

College administrators absolutely HATE men. We all know this. Almost every college has at least one initiative geared towards mocking men for their “fragile masculinity,” denigrating so-called “toxic masculinity,” or treating men as if they’re all potential rapists, in need of remedial feminist education on how to respect women.

Princeton University, for example, is hiring a “Men’s Engagement Manager” to fight against “toxic masculinity.” Ithaca College, meanwhile, has sponsored lectures on “masculinity and violence,” and Duke University has an ongoing “Men’s Project” designed to teach men how to “begin the work of unlearning violence.”

Those are just a few of the dozens of initiatives colleges host to fight masculinity, many of which are essentially “masculinity re-education camps,” recruiting men into secretive clubs to confess their sins, sacrifice their soul to the feminist gods, and vow never to be chivalrous or tough again.

While these groups are de rigueur on most college campuses, until this year, Wake Forest University didn’t have anything like it. But that changed this year. The school has launched a “Leave Patriarchy Behind” group (full title: Leaders who Educate, Advocate, and lift Voices for gender Equity), which is recruiting male students to create a more “gender equitable campus,” to “create events and programs” that promote feminism, and to facilitate a capstone workshop on “Getting to Know Feminism.”

The “Leave Patriarchy Behind” group is already getting an early start this semester, and will host a lecture on “Beyond the Waves: Getting to Know Feminism” the second week of September. The workshop, which will be facilitated by students for students, vows to explore feminist issues in an “interactive” and critical” way:

What do people mean when they talk about the patriarchy? What does feminism and marriage have to do with one another (sic)? What are issues women and girls around the world still face? Join us for Beyond the Waves: Getting to Know Feminism to find out!

The group also will teach students “terms related to feminism” and “to think about how feminism shows up in U.S. society and around the world.” While it’s unclear what exactly the group plans to teach students, as Wake Forest did not respond to a request for more information from PJ Media, basic feminist theory can help us out here.

As I’ve taken numerous Women’s Studies courses (I’ve written about my experiences doing so here), it’s likely that Wake Forest is teaching men that they are personally responsible for patriarchy, and thus, if they don’t fight it, then they implicitly support it. (Guilt tripping is often a feminist recruitment strategy).

A core tenet of social justice theory is that if you are silent in the face of injustice, then “you have chosen the side of the oppressor.” And of course, men are always the oppressor in feminist theory, despite evidence, for example, that lesbians are more likely to commit domestic violence than men, and that women very often prey upon underage men, as Eric Owens has extensively reported for The Daily Caller.

And did you notice that the group plans to teach students the relation between “feminism and marriage”? Well, it’s not hard to surmise what they’re teaching.

Marriage is a heterosexist institution designed by men and promoted by capitalism to turn women into their husband’s property, completely at his whim. Or at least, that’s the narrative I learned from taking seven Women’s Studies classes in the past few years.

Don’t believe me? Here’s 11 Reasons NOT to Get Married by the Feminist Current writer professor Susan Cox, who explained that marriage “is still the same old patriarchal institution” and that it “benefits men, not women.”

“Marriage is not simply an expression of love between two people,” Cox argued. “It is a legal and social institution engineered within a context of heterosexuality, which exists to benefit men and control women, initiated in order reinforce the notion of women as property.”

She went on to explain that marriage ensnares women, helplessly trapping them.

“When you’re not married, you can leave your dude at any time” Cox said, adding that marriage is “extremely difficult for them to get out of it…. Almost like it was set up in a patriarchy or something!”

Cox’s thoughts encapsulated the current state of feminist theory on marriage, so it’s likely Wake Forest students will learn that in the new “Leave Patriarchy Behind” group. Which is sad, because gaslighting young kids into hating long term relationships is bound to give them commitment issues that will haunt them long after college ends.

Wake Forest also offers a number of other feminism-themed programs, such as a discussion group for women of color only, a “Black Women Discussion Group,” and a “Latinx Women Discussion Group.” PJ Media reached out to Wake Forest multiple times, but did not receive a response in time for publication.

Follow the author of this article on Twitter: @Toni_Airaksinen.