News & Politics

A Minnesota School Board Tells Students to Keep Secrets After 'Equity Audit' Survey

AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File

There was a time when we warned our children about adults who asked them to keep secrets. And with good reason. Little good can come from an adult imploring a child to keep something “just between us.” And yet that appears to have been exactly what happened in one Minnesota school district.

Recently, parents in the Sartell-St. Stephen School District took justifiable umbrage at an $80,000 “equity audit” conducted by the Equity Alliance of Minnesota. As part of the audit, students in the district were given a survey that they had no choice but to complete — even if they did not fully understand the questions. The survey included queries about their gender identity. The students were also told in no uncertain terms that discussing the contents of the survey with their parents was strictly verboten. You can listen to one student’s comments here.

Parents also had the chance speak their minds at the latest board meeting, and you can hear what they had to say here. Fast-forward to the 2:48 mark. That’s where it gets interesting.

The survey sounds fairly odious on spec. But beyond that, if CRT is not being taught in the schools as has been claimed by the Left, and if this is a legit survey, why were students told to keep the whole thing from their parents? If your cause is just/righteous/pure/whatever, then theoretically you have nothing to hide. You should be shouting your agenda from the rooftops and taking on all comers. There should be no need for subterfuge. Unless, of course, your goal is to change young minds and create an aura of distrust between children and their parents. That has been tried before, of course, and as history shows it never ends well. But the Left is too busy erasing history to read it.

Related: Missouri Teachers Plotted With CRT Advocate to Hide Radical Teaching From Parents

The district’s parents have no intention of letting this chicanery go unchallenged and continue to fight as you read this. You can follow their efforts on the website Kids Over Politics.  If you are not in the habit of  talking with your children about what they learned in school, you may want to start having those conversations this school year.