News & Politics

Taliban Blocks Access to Kabul Airport, Taliban Cofounder Returns, Biden's Chaos Reigns

(Screencap courtesy of CNN.)
Taliban blocks access to Kabul Airport? Just yesterday they were telling us they were nice guys

Earlier this week, the triumphant Taliban was boasting about their newfound respect for free speech, women’s rights, etc. — all within the boundaries of Sharia law, naturally.

I’m going to quit drinking — within the confines of cocktails at five, wine with dinner, a bedtime brandy, and the occasional Bloody Mary at breakfast.

Today the Taliban is preventing refugees from gaining access to Kabul Airport, the last remaining thread between death and a chance at escape from the Taliban’s tender mercies.

The Wall Street Journal reported early on Wednesday that “entry remained extremely difficult” to the airport with “checkpoints on most access roads and no clear system to bring people in.”

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The kinder, gentler Taliban don’t seem to want too many of those liberated women or former American translators to leave, and it doesn’t take much imagination to wonder why.

The chaos created in Kabul by Presidentish Joe Biden’s “murderously rushed pullout” even has CNN in near panic-mode.

Here’s the news network’s latest report, detailing the jubilant return of Taliban co-founder Mullah Baradar to Kabul.

As CNN put it all-too delicately, Bardar’s return “doesn’t bode well for Afghans hoping to avoid a return to brutal Islamist law.”

Indeed.

According to Reuters, Baradar was flown into Kabul on a Qatari C-17 Globemaster heavy-lift transport jet, reportedly on Tuesday.

The location of the video was verified by Reuters comparing terrain data to the surrounding area. Flight tracking data also showed a Qatari C17 Globemaster plane matching the registration mark of the plane seen in the video flying in the vicinity of Kandahar Airport.

Oddly enough, Baradar had tried to surrender Taliban forces to the U.S.-led coalition all the way back in 2001. The offer was rejected, and Baradar has been in prison or exile since.

His role in the new Taliban government is unclear, but in the Current Mess, very little is clear in Afghanistan — except for how Biden’s pique led to it all.