New Poll: A Third of Americans Support Tech Companies Using SPLC 'Hate Group' List to Blacklist Conservatives

Almost a third of Americans actually support Internet companies' decision to blacklist conservative organizations based on their presence on a "hate group" list published by the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC).

When asked whether "internet companies should use this list as an excuse to censor or suppress mainstream and non-violent conservative groups by denying them access to their services?" a full 32 percent of Americans said "yes." A larger minority, 43 percent, said internet companies should not suppress conservatives, while a full 25 percent admitted they did not know enough to have a strong opinion.

While the McLaughlin & Associates poll showed alarming support for silencing conservatives, it also revealed a strong preference for free speech, leading some to question whether or not respondents understood the question.

The question was indeed long and potentially confusing:

The liberal, George Soros funded, Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) has created a list of organizations it claims use "hate speech," and has placed many mainstream conservative political non-profit organizations on that list, mixing them in with genuine domestic terror groups like the KKK and Aryan Brotherhood. Recently, internet companies like Paypal, Google, Facebook and Twitter have started colluding with the SPLC by using their list as an excuse to selectively censor mainstream conservative thought. Knowing this to be true, do you think these internet companies should use this list as an excuse to censor or suppress mainstream and non-violent conservative groups by denying them access to their services?

Elsewhere, respondents showed a firm preference for free speech. When asked if the Constitution "guarantees that all Americans are entitled to free speech," 85 percent said everyone, including white supremacists and neo-Nazis, have free speech under the Constitution.

Another 85 percent identified free speech as "a fundamental right," while only 9 percent said speech should be restricted "if it offends some people."

Furthermore, when asked about "left-wing protesters" from antifa and told the group "advocates violence as the appropriate response to free speech they disagree with," respondents said they opposed the group. Almost two-thirds, 63 percent, opposed antifa, while only 21 percent supported the group. Sixteen percent said they didn't know, or just refused to answer.

When asked about the high level of support for silencing conservatives, Chris Gacek, senior fellow for regulatory policy at the Family Research Council (FRC), suggested that it was an outlier. "Given the other dimensions of the poll, it seems to be in tension. I think that the gist of this whole thing is that people are still very committed to free speech," Gacek told PJ Media.

He noted that for most Americans, "it's not unreasonable to not know" groups like antifa and the SPLC. When it comes to this specific result, he said "I think they’re probably just confused by the question."