News & Politics

Five Disturbing Songs Warn Against Democrat Midterm Gains

(Getty Images)

Feinstein. Avenatti. Blasey Ford.

The names toll over the political depths like warning buoys on a fog-bound sea.

Pelosi. Sinima. Waters.

Soros.

What do these names portend for the tempest that will culminate in a maelstrom of votes on November 6? While it looks as if a Republican Senate is safe, if the House falls, the tolling will signify a bitter turn away from President Trump’s path to prosperity, strength, safety, and greatness.

America will survive—in the short term—as a fractured and wounded behemoth, strung to earth by strife, the mismanagement of social justice bureaucracies, and a Democrat Deep State famished by years of waning power. Over time, enabled by a mass foreign invasion, the nation as founded will cease to exist.

Now gaze into the crystal ball, ponder the tea leaves of destiny, and countenance the tarot of extremity should the Democratic Party emerge in any sense victorious from the midterm fog of war.

1. “Machete” (Buckethead)

Who dons a Friday the 13th Jason mask and a Kentucky Fried Chicken bucket with a “Funereal” sticker?

Only one of the most talented guitarists Western culture has ever produced. He doesn’t go by his real name in performance, so we won’t identify him either.

When Buckethead’s mother was recovering from colon cancer in the late ’90s, he wrote her an album, the now-famous Colma.  The music is not death or black metal, but remains among the most unsettling aural landscapes ever recorded.

What Buckethead (a child of the Golden State) references in this work is none other than the city of Colma, California, a vast necropolis where the deceased outnumber the living by the thousands. The music he wrote for his mother (who survived until 2013) captures the profound intersect between the living, breathing and those who have passed.

Abortion on demand. Government-run healthcare. Militant secularism. The Death Tax. These are the necropolises, the Colmas of the Democratic Party.

2. “Russians” (Sting)

A ponderous and foreboding organ riff returns listeners to the darkest days of the Cold War, when Semyorka intercontinental ballistic missiles were always and forever just 30 minutes away from North America.

President Ronald Reagan and British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher helped secure that evil empire’s end. The two major U.S. political parties, though they disagreed on much, were in full agreement about the propitious nature of Soviet Russia’s fall.

Something happened on the way to the 21st century. Terror reared as the more likely nuclear threat. Putin rose from the ashes, a throwback horseman of renewed tyranny and empire.

Somewhere on the way to the 2018 midterms, the homegrown socialist hive that has abided for a near-century became the guiding light and last best chance of the American Left. Throw Russian “collusion” into the dustbin with the old regime. The Russians aren’t coming and they wouldn’t dare launch an ICBM strike.

The Democratic Socialists are here. Do they “love their children too” as Sting asks in this brilliant recital before a Russian audience? Sure, but never forget: they count their children as votes, as invaders, and as the spawn of a fundamental transformation.

3. “Rosemary’s Lullaby” (Spell)

We hear about white witches (supposedly “good”) and the flip side, black witches. White or black, it all amounts to occult paganism, but let’s humor the theme. If the recent Kavanaugh hearings are any indication, this is the season of the black witch.

In fact, covens of witches are gathered around bubbling cauldrons even as we prepare for pre-election Halloween festivities. At this hearing, the script is flipped. Men who are accused are convicted much like the unfortunate witchy women of antiquity.

Poor Rosemary was not a witch. But she fell in love with a Faustian husband, who led her to the worst imaginable horror. Continuing the theme, black witches would celebrate the birth of the antichrist. And they would have no qualms, if witches are capable of having qualms, about the public and unjust destruction of a good man.

4. “Dracula Theme” (Wojciech Kilar)

Moviegoers in 1992 were deliciously spooked by Francis Ford Coppola’s epic recreation of Bram Stoker’s epistolary novel. The menace of the undead bloodsucker is captured magnificently in Kilar’s music for the film.

Are the Democrats our potential new Party of Darkness? They want to rescind the president’s tax cuts, to suck the life out of a newly-revived economy. They’re clinking glasses of (wine?) over a return to a regulatory reign of terror that will sap businesses large and small. And they anticipate with bared fangs a capitulation to ineffectual globalist climate accords that make America pay dearly while the real polluters remain free to poison the environment.

Conjured in Kilar’s main theme is the approach of one of literature’s most frightening figures. The Democrats are coming too, out of the shadows of lost midterms and presidential elections past.

5. “Halloween” (King Diamond)

Let’s lighten the mood a bit. It’s a sad commentary when King Diamond—an avowed Satanist—is presented as a mood lightener.

But Diamond’s paean to All Hallows’ Eve is one of the best ever. Driven by a Euro-crunch guitar riff and unforgiven lead solos, the song highlights the former Merciful Fate singer’s creepy falsetto-to-tenor vocal stylings and damnable lyrics:

  The moon is full, another perfect day, has begun,

Like a demon’s sun

Therein lies the rub, my friends.

Night is day.

Patriotism is xenophobia.

Normative heterosexuality is hate.

Accusation is guilt.

Prosperity is unjust.

Right speech is violence, left violence is speech.

Sovereignty is bigotry.

America is evil.

Vote as if your country depended on it.