News & Politics

Working-Age Deaths Up Whopping 40% and NOT Just From COVID, Says Life Insurance CEO

AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File

Deaths among working-age Americans are up a chilling 40%, according to OneAmerica CEO Scott Davison.

“What we saw just in third quarter, we’re seeing it continue into fourth quarter, is that death rates are up 40% over what they were pre-pandemic,” Davison said in a virtual news conference just before the New Year.

“We are seeing, right now, the highest death rates we have seen in the history of this business – not just at OneAmerica.”

The increased death are occurring almost exclusively among “working-age people 18 to 64.”

Davison told viewers, “Just to give you an idea of how bad that is, a three-sigma or a one-in-200-year catastrophe would be 10% increase over pre-pandemic.”

“40% is just unheard of,” he concluded.

Your typical Mainstream Media or government-issued report (is there still a difference?) hypes the number of positive test results, even though not everyone gets tested and test results can show positive even when someone just has a regular flu bug. What Davison is looking at for his numbers are the life insurance actuarial tables that can make or break his business.

So my first thought, when I saw a life insurance CEO saying that working-age deaths are up by 40%, was that it’s literally his business to know the facts.

As Dr. Robert Malone put it — on Substack, following his Twitter ban — this “is a nuclear truth bomb masquerading as an insurance agent’s dry manila envelope full of actuarial tables.”

It’s only the third day of January but I’m already picking this one for Most Chilling Story of the Year.

Actually, I take that back — if I’ve learned anything these last two years, it’s not to tempt the fates.

Last week, the Indiana Department of Health reported 12,020 new COVID cases on Thursday alone, and that’s a record. But there were only 48 COVID-related deaths, about a third less than the last time the caseload was this high.

“What the data is showing to us is that the deaths that are being reported as COVID deaths greatly understate the actual death losses among working-age people from the pandemic,” Davison said. “It may not all be COVID on their death certificate, but deaths are up just huge, huge numbers.”

Recommended: BUSTED AGAIN: AOC Maskless and Kissing Broadway Star at Florida Drag Queen Event

Indiana news outlet Center Square reports:

The number of hospitalizations in the state is now higher than before the COVID-19 vaccine was introduced a year ago, and in fact is higher than it’s been in the past five years, Dr. Lindsay Weaver, Indiana’s chief medical officer, said at a news conference with Gov. Eric Holcomb on Wednesday.

Just 8.9% of ICU beds are available at hospitals in the state, a low for the year, and lower than at any time during the pandemic. But the majority of ICU beds are not taken up by COVID-19 patients – just 37% are, while 54% of the ICU beds are being occupied by people with other illnesses or conditions.

What to make of the huge increase in working-age deaths, when ICU beds are only about a third filled with people who have COVID?

Malone worries that the vaccines might be causing the huge mortality increase, but that so far is only conjecture.

There are, however, a few things we know for a fact.

We know for a fact that people put off routine medical examinations during the pandemic.

We know for a fact that people put off necessary procedures, too, up to and including chemotherapy.

We know for a fact that people even put off emergency room visits.

We know for a fact that depression, overdose deaths, and suicide all went up — particularly among the young who actually have the least to fear.

So if it’s true that we’re seeing an unprecedented 40% spike in deaths among working-age Americans, don’t be surprised if those people died or took their own lives because their own government and media scared them out of taking care of themselves.