News & Politics

Killing Children with Safety: Child Obesity SOARED During COVID Lockdowns

AP Photo/Alex Brandon

Child obesity soared during the government-imposed COVID lockdowns last year, a new study shows.

According to the CDC, “the portion of 5-11-year-olds who are classified as overweight or obese is now 45.7 percent, up from 36.2 percent before the pandemic.”

That’s an increase of 25% in the rate of obesity among young children, by far the largest ever recorded.

Child Obesity Soared
(Chart courtesy of CDC.)

According to The74’s writeup of the study, “body mass index (a common measure of weight relative to height) in a sample of 430,000 children increased between March and November 2020 at nearly double the rate that it did before the pandemic began.”

Roughly 6 million American kids 11 and under entered the ranks of the obese in less than a year. You can safely bet that minority, urban kids were hit the hardest, given the severity of blue city lockdowns and the lack of backyards to play in.

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The sobering fact is that weight is easy to gain, difficult to take off, and that obesity is a killer far worse than COVID for people of any age. Obesity can and does lead to Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, liver disease, and even certain cancers.

Nearly 50% of GenZ and under are sitting on a long-term health timebomb, in no small part because so many have been kept home, locked up, and made frightened of human contact.

Never mind the fact that kids barely get COVID, and die from it even less often.

The short version is that the lockdowns will kill far more of the youngest generation than COVID ever will.

About the only thing that compares to it also happened in 2020: An “unprecedented” spike in violent crime. Murders were up 29% last year over 2019, leaving 1968’s one-year record of 12.7% in the dust.

And we all know what kind of year 1968 was.

2020 was worse, none worse than for children.