Campus SJWs Get Paid by the Hour at the University of Arizona

Social justice warriors are going to social justice warrior. There's not much you can do except mock them for it. Or, you can do what the University of Arizona is doing and pay them for their "services."

That's right, the University of Arizona is paying students to be "Social Justice Advocates." Via Campus Reform:

The University of Arizona is paying students $10 per hour to assume the responsibilities of “Social Justice Advocates.”

According to an online job description, Social Justice Advocates, or SJAs for short, “will be responsible for instituting monthly programmatic efforts within the residence halls that focus specifically on social justice issues,” such as setting up “bulletin boards in the halls” and hosting “social justice modules once a month for the RAs.”

Successful applicants will be expected to “report any bias incidents or claims to appropriate Residence Life staff” in addition to hosting bi-semesterly “Real Talks” with dorm residents.

“The position also aims to increase understanding of one’s own self through critical reflection of power and privilege, identity and intersectionality, systems of socialization, cultural competency, and allyship as they pertain to the acknowledgement, understanding, and acceptance of differences,” the job description elaborates, noting that the ultimate goal of the position is to “increase a student staff member’s ability to openly lead conversations, discuss differences, and confront diversely insensitive behavior.”

Notably, SJAs are paid an hourly rate of $10, and are expected to work an average of 15 hours per week, meaning students who fill the position can expect to make about $150 per week for promoting “inclusive communities through positive interactions.”

So, let's get this straight. The university takes money from students and the Arizona taxpayers and funnels it toward a social justice Gestapo whose primary function seems to be a combination of social justice secret police and indoctrination activities, and this is supposed to be a good thing? Really?

All these "Social Justice Advocates" need to complete their ensemble is a pair of jackboots and armbands.

No, I'm not being melodramatic, either.

You see, when you pay someone to report "bias incidents," then those paid are far more likely to feel obligated to report something. After all, what do they tell their supervisors when asked why they haven't reported anything? "Sorry, boss, but my friends are perfect angels of social justice and we just don't go anywhere, ever."