New Zealand Transgender Weightlifter Shatters Records

A New Zealand weightlifter, who previously competed in the sport as a man, has won the women's over 90 kilogram division at the World Masters Games in Aukland.

Get used to it, ladies. I predict that women who used to be men and have "transitioned" to female are going to be the biggest story of the next Olympics.

Right now, not everyone is paying attention to this growing issue. But you won't be able to avoid it when women who used to be men start winning medals, taking awards away from people who were born female.

Only a social justice warrior besotted with fervid ideology can't see the towering unfairness of what happened in New Zealand.

And it didn't sit well with some of the girls.

The 39-year-old lifted 123kg in the snatch discipline, and then produced a clean-and-jerk lift of 145kg for a 268kg total - 19kg better than the second-placed competitor.

Hubbard was congratulated by her competitors after the ceremony.

However, afterwards, bronze medallist Kaitlyn Fassina was less effusive.

"She is who she is. That's the way the politics...and what the New Zealanders have decided. I can't say much more than that. She is seen as female and that's the way it is."

Two-time Olympian Deborah Acason went further.

"If I was in that category I wouldn't feel like I was in an equal situation. I just feel that if it's not even why are we doing the sport?"

Weightlifting New Zealand's Emma Pilkington said Hubbard was feeling "overwhelmed".

"She's so genuine, she loves all her team-mates and her teammates are all really supportive."

That result will give Hubbard a major claim for selection for the NZ weightlifting team for next year's Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast in Australia.

It's understood Hubbard, who once competed at national level as Gavin Hubbard, transitioned in her mid-30s.

How far will this game of "let's pretend someone born a man who becomes a woman via surgery and drugs is on a level playing field with those who were born a woman" go?

Physiology doesn't lie. And there are certain physical characteristics of someone born a man that don't "transition" just because that male decides he wants to live as a female.

One of those physical characteristics is people born male have vastly superior upper body strength compared to someone born a woman. No amount of new-age mumbo jumbo or feel-good bromides about gender fluidity will alter that physiological fact. Also, the skeletal structure of a man is different than that of a woman, allowing men to run faster and jump higher.

So Deborah Acason's question is valid: why should someone born a woman compete in a sport for females when someone with the physiological advantages of a man is allowed to take part?