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A Year After Brussels Atrocity, Islam Strikes Again in London

The news is still breaking, but it doesn't look good:

A knifeman was shot by armed police in the grounds of Parliament today after pedestrians were mowed down in a terror attack on Westminster Bridge. More than 10 people are said to have been hit by a car on the central London bridge after a vehicle described as a '4x4' drove into pedestrians and cyclists.

An intruder, described by a witness as 'middle-aged and Asian', then managed to break into the grounds of the Houses of Parliament and stabbed a police officer before he was shot.

"Asian" is the British media's term for Muslim, usually Pakistani.

Prime Minister Theresa May is said to have been bundled into a car by a plain-clothes police officer and driven quickly from the scene. Scotland Yard said the attack, which comes a year to the day after the terrorist atrocities in Brussels, are being treated 'as a terrorist incident until we know otherwise'.

I suspect we will never know otherwise, and that this will turn out to be exactly what it appears, especially coming on the anniversary of the Brussels bombings last year. Muslims are obsessed with anniversaries, and often time their assaults on a technologically superior but morally supine West to mark them.

The attacks of 9/11, for example, commemorated various military disasters inflicted upon Islam by Christian armies defending their territory against Musselman expansionism. One was the Battle of Vienna, which terminated the previous wave of Mohammedan violence against Christendom, but another was the defeat inflicted during the Battle of Malta in 1565:

At dawn on May 18th, 1565, one of the largest armadas ever assembled appeared off the Mediterranean island of Malta. Its 200 ships had been sent by Suleiman the Magnificent, sultan of the vast Ottoman empire to destroy the Knights of Malta who had long been a thorn in his side. Aboard were crammed some 40,000 fighting men, including 6,000 of Suleiman’s elite infantry, the Janissaries, not to mention another 9,000 cavalry and seventy huge siege cannon, one or two of which were capable of hurling 600lb stones a mile and a half. Opposing this force were just 600 knights, a few thousand mercenaries and a few thousand Maltese irregulars – in all between 6,000 and 9,000 men. Once Malta fell, which Suleiman’s commanders thought should take a week, the Turks would evict the Spanish from Tunis and then invade Sicily and Italy.

Didn't quite work out that way:

But the commander had not counted on the mettle of his enemy – the Knights of St John. Nor on the determination of their leader Grand Master Jean Parisot de la Valette, who vowed that the fort would not be taken while one last Christian lived in Malta.

On news of the grotesque discovery of the headless knights – many of them his personal friends – Grand Master Valette quickly ordered that captured Turks imprisoned deep in the vaulted dungeons of the fort be taken from their cells, and beheaded one by one.

Then he returned a communiquè of his own: the heads of his Turkish captives were fired from his most powerful cannon direct into the Muslim lines. There would be no negotiation, no compromise, no surrender, no retreat. We Christians, the Grand Master was saying, will fight to the death and take you with us.