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The Chilling Reason Why Black Lives Matter Memorializes Fidel Castro

Two days after Cuban dictator Fidel Castro bit the dust, Black Lives Matter memorialized him, and the reasons for it are not pretty. Castro killed thousands of his own people, imprisoned many more, caused 1 million refugees to flee to the United States, and even canceled Christmas. But Black Lives Matter celebrated him — because he provided a refuge for cop killers.

"Although no leader is without their flaws, we must push back against the rhetoric of the right and come to the defense of El Comandante," reads the declaration, published by the "Black Lives Matter" account on Medium.com. While the movement has no single leader, this Medium account attempts to speak for it, and it has 12.6 K followers. Moreover, the sentiments expressed in this article echo the Marxist demands of the Movement for Black Lives, which speaks for a broad coalition of groups in the movement.

The key lesson Black Lives Matter learned from Castro? "Revolution is continuous and is won first in the hearts and minds of the people and is continually shaped and reshaped by the collective," the article declared. "No single revolutionary ever wins or even begins the revolution. The revolution begins only when the whole is fully bought in and committed to it. And it is never over."

Yes, Black Lives Matter said this of a brutal dictator who oppressed his own people. If any "revolutionary" least exemplified the idea that "no single revolutionary ever wins or even begins the revolution," it is Fidel Castro. Or rather, it would be, if Joseph Stalin, Adolf Hitler, Mao Zedong, and Pol Pot hadn't set records even Castro couldn't beat.

The exact number of Cubans killed by the Castro regime remains unknown, but estimates range from 2,000 to 33,000, with a mid range of 15,000 — in a country of only 7 million people. In per capita terms, that is the equivalent of 680,000 executions in the United States (with its population of 318 million). That's the entire population of Denver or Seattle.

But that's just mass murder — don't forget political prisoners! The Cuban Commission for Human Rights and National Reconciliation  received over 7,188 reports of arbitrary detentions from January through August of 2014. According to PolitiFact, there are at least 97 known current political prisoners. These prisons are overcrowded and unhygienic, with prisoners forced to work 12-hour days, Human Rights Watch reported. Inmates have no effective complaint mechanism to seek redress.

Cuba's government still refuses to recognize human rights monitoring as a legitimate activity, and government authorities have been reported to harass, assault, and imprison human rights defenders.

Furthermore, the government controls all media outlets and tightly restricts access to outside information. Internet access is highly restricted, and government critics have been attacked and arbitrarily arrested. Some travel regulations once required an extra visa to leave the island, and were used to prevent the family members of those critical of the government from leaving.

Only a government like this could cancel Christmas, which Castro did in 1969, to prevent celebrations from getting in the way of the sugar harvest. For nearly thirty years, Cuba was officially an atheist nation, and the Christmas ban lasted until December 1997. Preparing for a visit by Pope John Paul II planned for January of 1998, Castro declared that Christmas would be a national holiday — for one year only! Luckily for those traumatized by Cuba's real-life Chronicles of Narnia wicked witch, the change stuck.

Is it any wonder that 1 million refugees fled to the United States? But that was unacceptable too. Castro's government tried to prevent the emigration at all costs, killing those trying to flee. On July 13, 1994, Castro's forces killed 37 would-be escapees, most of them children and their mothers, in the infamous Tugboat Massacre.

Miami's Cuban population loudly celebrated when Castro died, but not Black Lives Matter. No, they mourned Castro, because he had harbored American criminals who had murdered police officers.

Next Page: The real reason Black Lives Matter mourned Fidel Castro.