The PJ Tatler

Anti-Gun Group Worries What Your Drunk College-Age Daughter Might Do with a Gun

Last night, gun-grabbing group “Everytown for Gun Safety” shared its concern on Twitter about what your drunk college-age daughters might do with a gun.

The link goes to an opinion piece with a title similar to the the tweet: “You think your drunk college-age daughters are bad with their iPhones? Imagine them with guns.” Author Anne Skomorowsky writes about her fears concerning her college-aged daughter, who left for college last year at age 17.  Specifically, she is worried her daughter will be raped in college.

The main idea behind the piece is that college-aged women are so irresponsible with their cell phones, they couldn’t possibly be trusted to have a gun to protect themselves. And perhaps this is true for Skomorowsky’s daughter, who we learn is not only irresponsible with her cell phone but is also drinking underage (illegal). Now that some colleges are considering allowing concealed carry weapons on campuses, with all these irresponsible young women around, there will be “accidents” and lost guns littering the campuses, opines Skomorowsky.

But it’s a mistake to think that all young women are irresponsible.  Gun ownership involves responsibility.  If you think you cannot be responsible with a gun, you shouldn’t have one — but that doesn’t mean others shouldn’t have one.

There are laws on the books in most places about drinking and firearms. In my state, it is against the law to carry a concealed firearm under the influence and it’s illegal for me to go into an establishment that sells liquor and drink. I can go into a bar or restaurant with my gun, but I can’t order a margarita.  Perhaps Skomorowsky is worried that young women will disregard the gun laws her gun-grabbing friends love to impose as much as her daughter disregards the legal age for drinking.

If you want to carry a gun on campus to protect yourself then you can’t drink alcohol, and frankly avoiding excessive drinking at parties with strangers might help you avoid sexual assault.

Skomorowsky prefers iPhones to guns as she describes the iPhone as an “anti-rape” device. As an aside, iPhones have been around awhile and people would have us believe there are more rapes then ever, so I guess the iPhone isn’t that effective in this regard. But a cell phone can’t stop a situation of imminent threat against an overpowering assailant the way brandishing or using a weapon can.

Those who feel they can be responsible gun owners should be free to do so on a college campus or anywhere else.