Iran Pulls the Rug From Under Obama

According to the Oxford English dictionary, the proverb "the wish is father to the thought" means "we believe a thing because we wish it to be true." President Obama wanted a deal with Iran so badly that he thought he actually had one. However, today President Rouhani of Iran spelled it out for him. The deal he had isn't the one he thought he had. USA Today reports:

Iran's president on Thursday said Tehran will not sign a final nuclear deal unless world powers lift economic sanctions imposed on the country immediately.

The United States, United Kingdom, France, Russia, China and Germany -- the so-called P5 +1 group -- reached an understanding with Iran last week on limits to its nuclear program in return for lifting crippling economic sanctions, after extended talks in Lausanne, Switzerland.

The U.S. has previously said the sanctions would be lifted in phases, but the details have not yet been negotiated.

However, in a televised speech on Thursday, President Hassan Rouhani appeared to rule out a gradual removal of the successive round of sanctions that have hit hard its energy and financial sectors -- and crippled its economy.

"We will not sign any deal unless all sanctions are lifted on the same day," Rouhani said, according to Reuters. "We want a win-win deal for all parties involved in the nuclear talks," he said.

Rouhani added "the Iranian nation has been and will be the victor in the negotiations." That's rubbing it in.

Only yesterday:

Acting State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf on Wednesday dismissed a critique of the Iran nuclear agreement from former secretaries of State Henry Kissinger and George Schultz, by saying their comments amount to “big words” and that the two secretaries don’t live in the real world. “I heard a lot of, sort of, big words and big thoughts in that piece,” she said.

So for Harf's benefit, as well as that of her employer, here's Agence France-Presse:

Iran wants international sanctions lifted on the day of the implementation of an agreement with world powers on its nuclear programme, President Hassan Rouhani said on Thursday. "We will not sign any agreements unless on the first day of the implementation of the deal all economic sanctions are totally lifted on the same day," Rouhani said.

Or, as CNN puts it: "Iran: No signing final nuclear deal unless economic sanctions are lifted on same day."

Not that Tehran's about-face changes anything. In the administration's words, "a bad deal is better than no deal." And sure, this is a bad deal, but it's a "once in a lifetime deal."

Obama says his doctrine is "we will engage," but it looks like the actual doctrine is "we will be fooled." Of course they insist that nobody will make a fool of them, however they reserve the right to make fools of themselves.

It's painful to watch. It's hard not to think that Iran is out to humiliate Barack Hussein Obama. With this calculated slight, they not only want to wipe the floor with his reputation, they want to see him crawl. And he probably will. Obama gave them Iraq, allowed Iran into Syria, permitted Hezbollah to take over Lebanon, and let them run him out of Yemen all in the expectation that Rouhani would give him his "game changer," his "once in a lifetime deal."

And now, after he's handed in all that earnest money and proclaimed his purchase to the world, they won't deliver the merchandise. He's been had, pure and simple. They gave him a special surprise gift and he's proudly opened it in front of relatives and friends, only to discover it contains a pile of ... .

Iran knows he won't fight, because he's already scuttled his position in Iraq and allowed himself to be humiliated in Syria by drawing "red lines" with crayons. His "moderate rebel forces" in Syria have all defected to someone else. Iran watched America flee from Yemen, Obama's counterinsurgency "model," leaving a list of local U.S. intelligence agents to fall into their hands. Those men are probably being hunted down or dying in agony. Tehran probably gaped in amusement as he made enemies with their oldest ally in the Middle East, Israel, all for the sake of the agreement they have now thrown in his face.

If Obama was going to fight, he would have done so already. And now it's too late. Who in the region will trust Barack Obama? Israel? The survivors of Yemen? A loyal remnant in Syria?  Maybe someone in Anbar who fought for America and then escaped first from ISIS and then the IRG?

Maybe there's somebody left who hasn't been sold out.

So let's ask Marie Harf: how does it feel to be double-crossed? In a way, this final act of cruelty is not in Iran's interest. The Hill reports that the Left had gone all out to endorse Obama's "historic" deal: "Liberal Democrats have mounted a furious offensive to convince Senate Democrats to oppose legislation the White House warns could kill a nuclear deal with Iran." House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) declared that "these negotiations must be allowed to proceed unencumbered."

But some people are so craven they excite disgust even from those at whose feet they fall. The ayatollahs had to kick at the upturned faces. They just couldn't help themselves.

It's not too late for Obama to ask himself: is this how an American behaves? Is this how any self-respecting person behaves? But maybe it is too late. Maybe it's been too late for a long time.


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