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Left Unleashes Unhinged 'Child Labor' Attack on Trump Education Pick Betsy DeVos

President-elect Trump announced on Wednesday that billionaire Republican donor Betsy DeVos, a school choice activist, was his pick to head the Department of Education. The left immediately commenced a collective tantrum over the school choice issue—the New York Times shrieking in a headline that she has "steered money from public schools"—and promptly declared DeVos unfit for the position based on that single issue.

Alana Horowitz Satlin, the assignment editor at Huffington Post, is also concerned about that issue, but in a breathless essay on Thursday, she also informed readers of an even more egregious sin in DeVos's past—something so fearful that it would irrevocably endanger the children of America. Betsy DeVos, you see, supports child labor. That's right. It says so right there at the Huffington Post under the headline "Group Funded By Trump’s Education Secretary Pick: ‘Bring Back Child Labor'":

A think tank funded by Donald Trump’s Secretary of Education pick recently advocated for putting kids back in the workforce.

The Acton Institute, a conservative nonprofit that is said to have received thousands of dollars in donations from Betsy DeVos and her family, posted an essay to its blog this month that called child labor “a gift our kids can handle.”

“Let us not just teach our children to play hard and study well, shuffling them through a long line of hobbies and electives and educational activities,” said the post’s author, Joseph Sunde. “A long day’s work and a load of sweat have plenty to teach as well.”

Setting aside the fact that DeVos wasn't the one who made the comment about child labor (she was an Acton Institute board member for ten years and her family's foundation has donated money to the group), it's hilarious seeing the left get the vapors anytime "work" is mentioned in a sentence. God forbid that children should have to add a little sweat equity to their families and learn the rewards of a healthy work ethic.

The essay by Acton's Joseph Sunde was originally called "Bring back child labor. Work is a gift our kids can handle." In it he wrote:

What if we were to be more intentional about creating opportunities for work for our kids, or simply to more closely disciple our children toward a full understanding of the role of their work in honoring God and serving neighbor? In our schools and educational systems, what if we stopped prioritizing “intellectual” work to the detriment of practical knowledge and physical labor, paving new paths to a more holistic approach to character formation? In our policy and governing institutions, what if we put power back in the hands of parents and kids, dismantling the range of excessive legal restrictions, minimum wage fixings, and regulations that lead our children to work less and work later? (This could be something as simple as letting a 14-year-old work a few hours a week at a fast-food restaurant or grocery store.)

The man is clearly a monster.

After a backlash that likely involved much pearl-clutching and some fainting couches, Sunde changed the headline to a less-threatening "Work is a gift our kids can handle" and added a disclaimer that he does not "endorse replacing education with paid labor," nor does he "support sending our children back into the coal mines or other high-risk jobs."

(He also said essentially the same thing in the original essay, but if you were only scanning the article for trigger words you might have missed it.)