News & Politics

25 Black Ministers Ask Warnock to 'Uphold the Biblical Defense of Life'

AP Photo/Ben Gray, Pool

Georgia Democratic Senate candidate Raphael Warnock is pastor of the iconic Ebenezer Baptist Church, where Rev. Martin Luther King’s thundering sermons against racism still echo today.

King was silent on abortion (he was assassinated five years before Roe v Wade), but his niece Alveda says Dr. King was pro-life and pro-abstinence before marriage. That shouldn’t surprise us. King based his anti-racism civil rights campaign on biblical beliefs, so it’s natural he would have opposed the taking of any life.

But Warnock, as a Democrat, knows his electoral salvation lies with pro-choice women and he has taken a decidedly pro-choice position in the campaign. This has inspired Alveda King and two dozen other black ministers to send a letter to Warnock, pleading with him to obey the Bible’s teachings against abortion.

Fox News:

“Unborn Black, Brown and White lives are so much more than clumps of cells, burdensome inconveniences, or health problems,” they wrote to the  Rev. Raphael Warnock. “They are sacred human persons endowed by God with inalienable dignity and worth. We implore you to uphold the Biblical defense of life and to fight against the systemic racism of abortion.”

They argued that “the pro-abortion movement has been characterized by racism and White supremacy since its inception,” noting that Black women are five times more likely than White women to undergo such a procedure.

Like many Democrats who have to finesse the abortion issue because of their religion, Warnock tries to frame the issue in terms of privacy.

“Reverend Warnock believes a patient’s room is too small a place for a woman, her doctor, and the U.S. government and that these are deeply personal health care decisions — not political ones,” Warnock campaign spokesperson Michael J. Brewer told Fox News. “He also believes those who are concerned about life, ought to be focused on the incredibly high rates of infant mortality and maternal mortality and working to make sure we are expanding access to health care, not taking it away.”

Tell the feminists and pro-abortion fanatics it’s not a “political issue.” They’d be surprised to hear that their advocacy has been wrong all these years.

“We applaud your commendable efforts to share Christ while pursuing political solutions to our most pressing problems today,” [the ministers] wrote [in the letter]. “But precisely because we share so much in common with you, we feel compelled to confront your most recent statements concerning abortion.”

The Warnock campaign hit back, noting that some of the signatories of the letter weren’t Democrats and had supported Republican candidates in the past. But the minister who organized the letter, Dean Nelson, strongly insists that the signers’ politics are irrelevant:

“The message of the letter is relevant no matter who some of the signatories support, even though there are Republicans, Independents, and Democrats who have signed it,” he said. “Rev. Warnock’s extreme embrace and advocacy for abortion conflicts with biblical teaching and true justice for humanity. We urge him to reconsider his support for it.”

As Warnock’s radicalism on other issues is revealed, he’s been very careful to maintain a position on abortion that’s pro-choice, but mainstream. This won’t suit his radical, pro-abortion backers, but for once, Warnock is ignoring them. This is Georgia, not California or New York. Mainstream still sells in much of the state.

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