News & Politics

Did the Chinese Consulate in Houston Clandestinely Work to Stoke Racial Tensions in U.S.?

(AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

According to Asia analyst Gordon Chang, the Chinese consulate in Houston, recently ordered closed by the state department, may have been clandestinely supporting various protest groups in the United States with the goal of stoking racial violence.

Chinese consulates across the country have come under renewed scrutiny in recent months as several high-profile hacking jobs targeting Americans were exposed. Just recently, two college-age hackers were arrested by the FBI and charged with several cybercrimes.

The Chinese consulates in America have become nests of spies and saboteurs, so it shouldn’t surprise us that they are carrying out directives of the Chinese Communist government to weaken and divide America by stirring the pot of racial division.

Fox:

“Also, there are stories that this consulate had links with protest groups in the United States providing financial and logistical support. That’s unconfirmed,” he added. “But, what is confirmed is that the Chinese Foreign Ministry and the Communist Party’s global ties have been engaged in a malicious disinformation campaign, deliberately stoking racial tensions in the U.S.

“And, U.S. Customs has seized items coming from China this year that would be very handy for protesters,” Chang noted.

It’s one thing to create false Facebook and Twitter accounts to try and influence the American election, as Russia is accused of doing in 2016. But it’s quite another thing to give aid to violent protest groups, buy off journalists, steal intellectual property, hack into private networks, and conduct massive surveillance operations designed to undermine the American government.

Nations have fought wars over less.

The consulate in San Francisco is being accused by the FBI of harboring a Chinese spy.

Tang Juan, a researcher at the University of California, Davis, stated on her J-1 visa application that she “had never served in the military, but open source investigation revealed photographs of her in the uniform of the Civilian Cadre of the PLA [People’s Liberation Army], and that she had been employed as a researcher at the Air Force Military Medical University, which is another name for FMMU [Fourth Military Medical University],” the FBI claimed.

Then, during an interview with FBI agents on June 20, Tang “denied serving in the Chinese military, claimed she did not know the meaning of the insignia on her uniform, and that wearing a military uniform was required for attendance at FMMU because it was a military school.”

The FBI revealed it then executed a search warrant immediately at Tang’s home and found additional evidence of Tang’s PLA affiliation.

Consulates are supposed to be sovereign territory. But they exist entirely at the discretion of the host country. There’s no international law that says a consulate needs access to the internet or cell phones.

The problem is retaliation. China will now close at least one of our consulates and we will respond in kind. Eventually, the two sides will tire of the game, but until that happens, a closer eye should be kept on Chinese consulates across the country.