News & Politics

Labor Leader Jeremy Corbyn Wonders Why al-Baghdadi Wasn't Arrested

ISIS video screenshot with the names of martyrs added. This is the photo Facebook banned Faith McDonnell over.

The man who wants to be the prime minister of Great Britain, Labor Party Leader Jeremy Corbyn is a dunce.

During an interview with the British talk radio network LBC, Corbyn made a shocking statement about dead ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi that showed why the Conservative Party of Boris Johnson is likely to win the upcoming general election.

Corbyn was asked about the death of Baghdadi and whether he considered it “a tragedy.” Corbyn had said at the time of the death of Osama Bin Laden was killed that it was “a tragedy” he didn’t go to trial.

BBC:

When Mr Corbyn was asked by LBC whether he also considered the the death of Baghdadi a tragedy, he replied: “If we preach internal law and international legal process through the international court of justice and The Hague, then we should carry out [sic].

“And if it’s possible to arrest somebody and put them on trial, then that is what should have been done and that is what I said about the death in 2011 and will continue to be my principle.

“If we believe as we do in international law and justice and the power of the international court of justice then we should do everything we can to bring people where they deserve to go on trial to be put on trial.”

When asked whether the death of Baghdadi was a good thing, Mr Corbyn replied: “Him being removed from the scene is a very good thing.

“If it would have been possible to arrest him, I don’t know the details of the circumstances at the time, I’ve only seen various statements put out by the US about it – surely that would have been the right thing to do.

“If we want to live in a world of peace and justice, we should practice it as well.”

Of course, al-Baghdadi blew himself up with a suicide vest rather than be taken alive to stand trial in the International Criminal Court at the Hague.

Boris Johnson could barely believe his good fortune. Corbyn pulled a “Gerald Ford” in showing his ignorance of foreign policy. Ford said during his televised debate with Jimmy Carter that there was “no Soviet domination” of Poland — a fact that would have surprised the Poles if the Soviets had allowed them to hear it.

Boris Johnson called his words “naive to the point of being dangerous”.

The Conservative leader said he had not heard Mr Corbyn’s LBC interview, but asked about the Labour leader’s remarks at a press conference, he said: “It’s very important when we look at the threats this country faces that we are realistic about what we must do to be strong in the face of those threats.”

He said Baghdadi was an “absolutely diabolical foe of this country and our liberal values”, adding that it was “not realistic to suggest he could be apprehended by the police in the circumstances he was finally run to ground”.

Is Corbyn right? I guess it depends on your notions of “justice.” Some might believe that true “justice” would have been to capture Baghdadi and roast him over an open fire — slowly. But such Medieval ideas of “justice” offend modern sensibilities. We’re so much more civilized than that.

If Baghdadi had been captured alive and tried in an international court, he might have gotten 20 years in prison, making him eligible for parole at age 69. Would that have been “justice”?

In truth, there is no punishment that would give solace to the families of his tens of thousands of victims or somehow balance the scales of justice. We have no laws that could adequately address the monstrous crimes of this man. Letting him sit in a comfortable prison for the rest of his life and die a natural death falls a little short of fairness. That he gloried in the blood he spilled makes no difference when it comes to the law. That he would show no remorse would be a given.

What would be “fair” that might satisfy the needs of “justice”? It’s a moot question given that Baghdadi took the coward’s way out and killed himself (along with two children). For myself, justice in the abstract is meaningless.

If he were before me and it was my choice, I’d fire up the barbecue.