News & Politics

Tunisia Arrests 18-Year-Old Nephew of Berlin Killer Anis Amri

EDITORS NOTE GRAPHIC CONTENT - The body of Anis Amri lies on the pavement in the outskirts of Milan after a shootout with the Italian Police, early Friday, Dec. 23, 2016. German officials issued a Europe-wide wanted notice for Amri on Wednesday, after he was identified as the key suspect in the truck attack that killed 12 people and injured 56 others. Anis Amri, a 24-year-old Tunisian, was shot dead early Friday by police conducting a routine stop in Milan after he opened fire on them. (ANSA via AP)

Tunisian state officials have announced the arrest of the 18-year-old nephew of Anis Amri, the radical Muslim who carried out a bloody terror attack at a Berlin Christmas market earlier this week, killing 12 and wounding dozens more.

According to Tunisia, Fedi — as the boy is called — was part of Amri’s terror cell. He supposedly planned to travel to Europe, where he intended to carry out a terror attack of his own. Two other men who belonged to the same terror cell as Fedi and Amri were also arrested.

The country’s interior ministry said that Amri had sent money to his nephew so he could join him in Europe. The Berlin killer had also told his nephew to join ISIS and pledge allegiance to its leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi.

In its statement the ministry explained:

One of the members of the cell is the son of the sister of the terrorist (Anis Amri) and during the investigation, he admitted that he was in contact with his uncle through the messaging service Telegram.

Furthermore, Amir had told his nephew to adopt the same hateful jihadist ideology and “asked him to pledge allegiance to Daesh [ISIS].”

And that’s not all.

According to Fedi, Amri was not just a terrorist in Germany, but “the prince” or leader of his own terror group known as the Abu al-Walaa brigade.

Meanwhile, Spain has announced it’s also investigating Amri’s contacts. Apparently, Amri had at least one contact person in Spain.

In other words, from the looks of it, we haven’t seen the last of Amri’s terror group just yet. It is quite possible that some of his friends (and relatives?) plan to carry out more terror attacks in the coming days and weeks. It goes without saying that this worries European authorities tremendously. One attack on a Christmas fair is bad enough, but more attacks in a short amount of time could truly create both public outrage and public panic.