News & Politics

Loudoun County Schools' Controversies Continue

AP Photo/Cliff Owen

Loudoun County Schools aren’t going to be out of the news cycle anytime soon.

After the bathroom rape of a teen girl at the hands of a gender-fluid male student in a skirt, the school system has become one of the flashpoints in the Virginia governor’s race.

Now a story from last week’s board meeting in which a mom told the story of the reason why she pulled her children from Loudoun County’s public school system.

Fox News reports:

“We had specifically moved them out of LCPS due to the swift and uncompromising political agenda of Superintendents Williams, Ziegler, and the school board had forced upon us. First, it was in the early spring of 2020 when my six-year-old somberly came to me and asked me if she was born evil because she was a white person. Something she learned in a history lesson at school,” the mother said at a school board meeting on Oct. 26. Video of her testimony has since spread on social media.

“Then, you kept the schools closed for a year-and-a-half, despite the science indicating it was safe for kids to return,” the mother continued. “Now, you’ve covered up a rape, and arrested, humiliated, and falsely accused parents of being domestic terrorists.”

The video of the meeting went viral when Christopher Rufo, among others, shared the clip.

As a result of the controversies piling on Loudoun County Schools, parents are starting to call for the resignation of Superintendent Scott Ziegler, along with the rest of the school board.

Related: COVER-UP: Loudoun County Schools Failed to Report Multiple Rapes Over Years

Democrat candidate for governor Terry McAuliffe has dismissed concerns over Critical Race Theory as a “right-wing conspiracy,” while former President Barack Obama condemned the “fake outrage” of concerned parents while campaigning on McAuliffe’s behalf, further stoking the frustration.

McAuliffe has further shot himself in the foot with his repeated assertions that parents should have no say in their children’s education.

 

McAuliffe’s opponent Glenn Youngkin has gone on record condemning CRT, stating that schools should teach history rather than teaching students “to view everything through a lens of race.”

These controversies swirling around Loudon County Schools have made a difference in the governor’s race, which is tighter than ever, according to poll averages from Real Clear Politics and FiveThirtyEight.

As Loudoun County can’t keep itself out of the news days before the election, it’ll be interesting to see if Youngkin’s supporters can take advantage of the outrage and get their candidate across the finish line.