News & Politics

McAuliffe, Abrams Peddle Conspiracies to Virginians at Rally

(AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)

 

Two left-wing conspiracy theorists stood on stage in a Virginia college town Sunday, spreading fear and misinformation to gullible attendees.

For some unbeknownst reason, Virginia gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe claimed that radical conspiracist Stacey Abrams should be Georgia’s governor, accusing current Gov. Brian Kemp of disenfranchising Peach State voters during the 2018 election.

The Democrat nominee espoused debunked claims at an event in Charlottesville, saying Abrams “would be the governor of Georgia today had the governor of Georgia not disenfranchised 1.4 million Georgia voters before the election.”

“That’s what happened to Stacey Abrams. They took the votes away,” he added.

Last week, McAuliffe proudly nodded along as Abrams — who literally believes she’s entitled to lead Georgia — repeated her lies and conspiracies about the 2018 race she lost to Kemp.

 

A week after losing in November 2018, Abrams conceded that “former Secretary of State Brian Kemp will be certified as the victor in the 2018 gubernatorial election,” but also petulantly added that Kemp had pinned “his hopes for election on suppression of the people’s democratic right to vote.” Over the last three years, the activist has repeatedly accused Kemp of suppressing the vote.

Related: Terry McAuliffe Still Won’t Acknowledge George W. Bush Won in 2000.

Meanwhile, even left-leaning fact-checkers from PolitiFact and USA Today found “no proof” and “little empirical evidence” to back up Abrams’ claims.

While Kemp did clean up the state’s voter rolls, experts have explained that this did not stop Georgians from voting.

“All the person had to do is show up with their photo ID, which everyone has to have, and they would’ve been allowed to vote,” a University of Georgia professor, hardly a conservative, explained at the time.

Other non-partisan election analysts have exposed Abrams for falsehoods coming from her new progressive organization.

Hillary Clinton, who probably still believes she won the presidency in 2016, also believes the bogus idea.

Of course, none of this is relevant to the Nov. 2 vote, which is why it’s been a rough month for Democrats in the Commonwealth.

After trailing all summer, Republican nominee Glenn Youngkin has eradicated McAuliffe’s advantage by running a laser-focused campaign on important issues, not lunacy.

Democrats are scrambling, using mostly ad hominem attacks and trying to bring Donald Trump into the race, even though Youngkin rarely mentions the former president.

Officials in liberal Fairfax County also face a lawsuit for violating election law, while some lawyers suggest that churches may have broken the law by allowing embattled Vice President Kamala Harris to urge attendees to vote for McAuliffe.

In an appalling move, public schools in the state capital are closing during election week, seemingly to ensure that teachers have paid time off to get out the Democrat vote.