News & Politics

California Cities Dominate Unemployment List as Red States Continue Success

AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli

More than half of the 15 U.S. metropolitan areas with the highest August unemployment rates are in California. It’s yet another blue state failure amid the COVID-19 economic recovery being led by red states that chose freedom and data over draconian mandates and anti-science lockdowns.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports the El Centro metropolitan area, which sits east of San Diego along the international border, led the nation’s nearly 400 metro areas, with an August unemployment rate of nearly 20 percent, compared to a national unemployment rate of 5.3 percent.

The Yuma metropolitan area, which straddles Arizona and California, had the nation’s second-highest unemployment rate at just over 18 percent.

Third and fourth place also went to California towns: Visalia-Porterville at over 10 percent, and Bakersfield metropolitan at 10 percent.

The sixth and seventh spots on the dubious list were the Merced and the Hanford-Corcoran metropolitan areas, both sitting in the Golden State’s San Joaquin Valley at 9 percent.

The large Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim metro area also made the Top 10 at nearly 9 percent.

Of the 10 highest unemployed locales, all except one part of South Texas sit in blue states.

The best place to land a job is in Lincoln, Nebraska. The capital city had the nation’s lowest August unemployment rate at a stunning 1.7 percent. It was followed by Grand Island, another Cornhusker State town, about 100 miles west, which finished second at just below 2 percent.

Other winners, all from red states where governors prized liberty and common sense over fear and punishment, include: Logan and Provo, Utah; Idaho Falls, Idaho; Gainesville, Ga.; Omaha, Neb.; Sioux Falls, S.D.; Enid, Okla.; and Fargo, N.D. All the aforementioned cities posted unemployment rates well under 3 percent.

Gov. Gavin Newsom, who survived a recall effort last month, responded to the harrowing news about his edicts — by mandating vaccines for all schoolchildren in the Golden State beginning sometime next year.