Revealed: U.S. Justice Department and New Hampshire's Criminal Investigation of James O'Keefe's Voter ID Video

PJ Media has obtained documents demonstrating that the New Hampshire attorney general was in discussions with Eric Holder’s Department of Justice regarding filing criminal charges against journalist James O’Keefe after he exposed vulnerabilities in New Hampshire’s electoral system in the January 10, 2012, presidential primary.

In his hidden-camera investigation, O’Keefe demonstrated how the lack of a photo-voter identification law in New Hampshire facilitated voter fraud by allowing impersonation of dead voters.  Worse, O’Keefe captured video showing that election officials like Ryk Bullock were oblivious to this vulnerability.

Ryk Bullock Ryk Bullock


Bullock said that voter impersonation of dead voters could not take place “because we are tied into a statewide system. So when someone passes away, that name is immediately dropped from the statewide database, within a matter of days. ... We go to great lengths.”  Bullock was wrong.

As a direct result of O’Keefe’s expose, the New Hampshire legislature passed a photo voter -identification law.

State and federal officials, however, targeted O’Keefe after his expose.

New Hampshire Associate Attorney General Richard Head managed a criminal investigation of O’Keefe which included boorish and unprofessional attempts to serve grand jury subpoenas on O’Keefe and his employees.

But documents reveal that Head’s pursuit of O’Keefe went beyond his ham-handed efforts at service of process.

On January 17, 2012, Head convened a meeting with at least eight top-ranking law enforcement officials about O’Keefe’s expose.  Included for this meeting were Obama appointee and United States Attorney for New Hampshire John Kacavas. State officials included Senior Assistant New Hampshire Attorney General Jane Young, Associate Attorney General Anne Edwards, Bureau Chief Mary Ann Dempsey, attorney Matthew Mavrogeorge, investigator Mark Mydrek, and Deputy Attorney General Ann Rice.

Ann Rice (L) and Jane Young (R) Ann Rice (L) and Jane Young (R)

The January 17 meeting was just the beginning.