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New ISIS Command to EAT Infidels Has Islamic Roots

In light of recent revelations that the Islamic State is teaching its followers to eat non-Muslims, surely we can now all agree that -- at least with this -- ISIS is truly not Islamic?

Alas, no.

The eating of “infidels” has precedents throughout Islamic history, especially as a terror tactic. And the first example concerns the jihadi par excellence, Khalid bin al-Walid (d.642), who was dubbed the “Sword of Allah” -- by Muhammad himself. Al-Walid holds a revered position among jihadi groups: the ISIS black flag with white Arabic text is a facsimile of the banner Khalid carried in battle.

During the Ridda, or “apostasy wars” against several Arab tribes that sought to break away from Islam following Muhammad’s death, Khalid falsely accused Malik bin Nuwayra, a well-liked Arab chieftain, of apostasy. After slaughtering him, Khalid raped -- though Muslim sources call it “married” -- Malik’s wife.

Yet Khalid was still not content:

He [Khalid] ordered his [Malik’s] head and he combined it with two stones and cooked a pot over them. And Khalid ate from it that night to terrify the apostate Arab tribes and others. And it was said that Malik’s hair created such a blaze that the meat was so thoroughly cooked.

(From Muslim historian al-Tabari’s multi-volume chronicle “al-bidaya w’al nihaya”, The Beginning and the End.” Arabic excerpt here.)

Another anecdote concerns the Islamic conquest of Spain. According to Muslim chronicler Ibn Abdul Hakam, after capturing a group of Christian winemakers, the Islamic invaders:

… made them prisoners. After that they took one of the vinedressers, slaughtered him, cut him in pieces, and boiled him, while the rest of his companions looked on. They had also boiled meat in other cauldrons. When the meat was cooked, they threw away the flesh of that man which they had boiled; no one knowing that it was thrown away: and they ate the meat which they had boiled, while the rest of the vinedressers were spectators.

These did not doubt but that the Moslems ate the flesh of their companion; the rest being afterwards sent away informed the people of Andalus [Christian Spain] that the Moslems feed on human flesh, acquainting them with what had been done to the vinedresser.

Tarek ibn Ziyad was another jihadi extraordinaire, revered for burning his boats on reaching Spain’s shores as proof of his commitment that only conquest (jihad) or death (“martyrdom”) was acceptable. He also had Christian captives slaughtered, cooked up, and apparently eaten in front of their fellow hostages. Then, according to Muslim historian Ahmad ibn Muhammad al-Maqqari:

“[Ziyad] allowed some of the captives to escape, that they might report to their countrymen what they had seen. And thus the stratagem produced the desired effect, since the report of the fugitives contributed in no small degree to increase the panic of the infidels” ( The History of the Mohammedan Dynasty, p. 276).