Brigham Young University Now Sells Caffeinated Soft Drinks

Pouring Soda

Ask most non-Mormons to describe The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (commonly known as the Mormon Church), and a variety of answers will be given. A few commonalities will stretch across most of the answers, including the belief that Mormons do not drink caffeinated beverages. About an hour ago, I would have included that assertion in my answer. However, like everyone else who believes that Mormons aren't allowed to drink caffeine, I would have been incorrect. Mormons can and do, indeed, drink caffeine.

Moreover, according to a press release from 2012, official Mormon Church doctrine does not forbid caffeine.

Responding to an episode of NBC's Rock Center with Brian Williams that spent the entire hour talking about the Mormon Church's beliefs and practices, the Mormon Church issued a statement with some clarifications. Gently chiding Brian Williams and NBC, the press release points out that "despite what was reported, the Church revelation spelling out health practices (Doctrine and Covenants 89) does not mention the use of caffeine. The Church’s health guidelines prohibit alcoholic drinks, smoking or chewing of tobacco, and 'hot drinks' — taught by Church leaders to refer specifically to tea and coffee."

If not for Brigham Young University, that five-year-old press release would've probably been confined to the dusty archives of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints website devoted to press releases and official church news.

The largest religious university in the United States, BYU is owned and operated by the Mormon Church. Ninety-nine percent of the more than 33,000 students at BYU are Mormons. The honor code that all students are expected to abide by is in strict adherence with Mormon doctrine and teaching. What happens at BYU is reflective of Mormonism, in general. That's what makes the news being reported by NPR newsworthy. According to NPR, "For the first time since the mid-1950s, students can buy caffeinated soft drinks at Brigham Young University's dining halls in Provo, Utah."

In a Q/A about the decision, BYU's Dining Services explains, "In the mid-1950s, the director of BYU Food Services decided not to sell caffeinated soft drinks.  This decision has continued on since that time. Until more recently, Dining Services rarely received requests for caffeinated soda.  Consumer preferences have clearly changed and requests have become much more frequent."

BYU's Dining Services acknowledges that some are unhappy about the change. To those people, BYU's Dining Services explains, "We realize that there are many choices to be made, and some are more nutritious than others.  We strive to offer a variety of food choices and encourage our customers to make healthy choices.  We encourage our patrons to visit the Dining Services website where a program is available to promote not only healthy eating, but also a healthy lifestyle.  The program is referred to on the website as EAT:  Eat, Act, Think."