Poll: Hillary Clinton More Unpopular Than One of the Least Popular Presidents

If Hillary Clinton is planning on running for president again in 2020, she'll be in for a rude awakening. Despite the much-touted fact that the former secretary of State received more votes than Donald Trump last November, she is still less popular than the sitting president, according to a new Bloomberg poll.

Media outlets have focused on Trump's bad poll numbers, but Clinton's most recent showing is even worse. According to the Bloomberg poll, Clinton is viewed favorably by only 39 percent of Americans, below Trump's admittedly dismal 41 percent. The poll showed she's even lost popularity among those who voted for her in November.

More than 20 percent of Clinton voters said they have an unfavorable opinion of the Democrat, up from 8 percent who said so just before the election. Only 6 percent of Trump voters say they view him unfavorably.

"There's growing discontent with Hillary Clinton even as she has largely stayed out of the spotlight," pollster J. Ann Selzer, who oversaw the survey, told Bloomberg Politics.

Selzer insisted, however, that "it's not a pox on the Democratic house because numbers fro other Democrats are good." The problem with this assessment is that Democrats do not have a unifying message, and a year after the presidential race, Clinton is the closest thing to a unifying figure the party has, with only divisive DNC Chair Tom Perez or Independent Senator Bernie Sanders (whose wife is under an FBI investigation) as possible contenders.

Bloomberg said the former secretary of State, former first lady, and former New York senator has "mostly kept out of sight" since the election. But her occasional speeches have compared America under President Trump to The Handmaid's Tale. Oh, and she blamed former FBI Director James Comey for her defeat — which she spun as a victory. "I beat both of them," she said of Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump.

I know, I know, everyone says she isn't running for president again. But Politico's Matt Latimer suggested otherwise. Latimer laid out the breadcrumbs: Clinton's move to close the Clinton Global Initiative, the rumor she is running for mayor of New York City, a new book deal, and even her concession speech, which suggested seasons to come.

Not to mention the Political Action Committee Clinton launched in May, aiming to bolster the Democratic Party for the 2018 elections. Even if the Dowager Empress of Chappaqua isn't running for president yet again, she won't go softly into that good night.

That may be a pity for her party, and for what remains of her good name. Hillary Clinton's legacy was that of a former first lady, a former senator, and a former secretary of State. Granted, she did not accomplish that much in the first two roles, and besides the blip of catching Osama bin Laden, her tenure at State was rather unimpressive (Russia, the Arab Spring, Benghazi).

Now, she's the woman who outspent her opponent 2 to 1, only to lose by avoiding the true battleground states in the election. She has no one but herself to blame, but her legacy consists of blaming others for her defeat, and encouraging far-Left Handmaid's Tale hysteria.

Is it any wonder she's less popular than Trump?