Ed Driscoll

Clown Nose Off

Daily Show executive producer/writer Rory Albanese, perhaps tired of having to assuage his boss’s ego or simply wishing to inadvertently confirm recent poll studies on the intolerance of “liberals,” drops the mask and unloads a dense cloud of flatulent smugness:

Albanese said the 2011-2012 Republican primary campaign, with such colorful candidates as Rick Perry and Hermain Cain, has been comic gold for “The Daily Show” and other jokesters.

“With all due respect to the candidates, there is the view that all of them are insane. A guy like Santorum, who’s taking an anti-college stance? That’s funny. I mean, who the f— is against college?

Speaking of the bipolar clown nose on/off setting, I love that “With all due respect” throat clearing before Albanese’s reactionary trashing of the GOP. But to answer his question on “who’s the f*** is against college,” in a sense, the Daily Show’s core audience is. One of the chief obsessions of the Occupy crowd has been their own enormous student loans incurred in obtaining nonsense degrees on such topics as postmodern Nicaraguan hermaphrodite deconstructionist poetry — not to mention Derrick Bell-inspired “Critical Race Theory.”

At Big Hollywood, Christian Toto responds to the Daily Show’s producer:

Should political comedians want to find the funny from the left they can just tune in to Rush Limbaugh on any given afternoon. Or, listen to President Obama offer his latest silly defense for the wilting economy or how algae will help power the nation.

“The Daily Show’s” Jon Stewart would have teed off on a GOP candidate who talked about algae in such a fashion. When it comes from Obama’s lips, you can hear the crickets.

The sooner comedy writers like Albanese admit that they have little interest in mocking the left, the sooner we’ll see comedy programs like “Saturday Night Live” and “The Daily Show” tackle politics in an unbiased fashion.

I’m not sure I agree with conclusion that Christian reaches — while I’m also happy to see MSM producers such as Albanese admit their biases (and more and more have over the last decade), the end result likely won’t be a return to the comparatively brief period of “unbiased” media, but more and more hyper-partisan shows, narrow-casted to their target audiences. But as long as these shows disclose their biases and there’s something for everyone’s worldview, that isn’t necessarily a bad thing.