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by
Rick Moran

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February 22, 2014 - 8:56 am

A remarkable turn of events in the Ukraine as a coup, or some kind of transition, seems to be underway. After signing the agreement with the opposition to hold new elections, curtail his power, and allow for a “government of national unity,” President Viktor Yanukovich fled the capital for the more friendly eastern city of Kharkiv.

At that point, the pro-Yanukovich speaker of Parliament resigned and was replaced by a supporter of jailed former Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko. Parliment then declared the president constitutionally unable to carry out his duties and set an early election for May 25. Protestors took over the president’s office, and rumors are swirling that Yanukovich has already resigned.

Several Yanukovich deputies resigned, including the interior minister, whose successor, a pro-opposition deputy, said that the police had now switched sides and were supporting the protestors.

Is any of this “legal”? Many eastern cities are refusing to accept the new government and Yanukovich himself has referred to the actions of the opposition as a “coup.”

Reuters reports:

The apparent toppling of the pro-Russian leader looks likely to dramatically alter the future of the former Soviet republic of 46 million people, pulling it closer to Europe and away from Moscow’s orbit.

It is also a stark reversal for Russian President Vladimir Putin’s dream of recreating as much as possible of the Soviet Union in a new Eurasian Union, in which Moscow had counted on Yanukovich to deliver Ukraine as a central member.

The Ukrainian parliament, which decisively abandoned Yanukovich after loyalists defected, declared the president constitutionally unable to carry out his duties and set an early election for May 25.

Deputies in the assembly stood, applauded and sang the national anthem.

In a television interview shortly beforehand, which the station said was conducted in the eastern city of Kharkiv, Yanukovich said he would not resign or leave the country, and called decisions by parliament “illegal”.

“The events witnessed by our country and the whole world are an example of a coup d’état,” he said, comparing it to the rise of the Nazis to power in Germany in the 1930s. He said he had come under fire. “My car was shot at. I am not afraid. I feel sorrow for my country,” he told UBR television.

Despite his defiance, the dismantling of his authority seemed all but complete with his cabinet promising a transition to a new government, the police declaring themselves behind the protesters and his jailed arch adversary expected to go free.

Parliamentary supporters of Yanukovich did not attend the session that voted out the president. They were in Kharkiv at a regional political conference. Needless to say, they are not accepting the new situation in Kiev:

Leaders of Ukraine’s Russian-speaking eastern provinces, however, voted to challenge anti-Yanukovych steps measures taken by parliament in Kiev. Eastern regional politicians meeting in Kharkiv adopted a resolution saying the measures “in such circumstances cause doubts about their … legitimacy and legality.

“The central state organs are paralysed. Until constitutional order and lawfulness are restored … we have decided to take responsibility for safeguarding constitutional order, legality, citizens’ rights and their security on our territories.”

The governor of Kharkiv, Mikhaylo Dobkin, told the meeting: “We’re not preparing to break up the country. We want to preserve it.”

The military seems to be sitting it out, so it’s hard to see how the pro-Russian deputies can do much about the situation.

Russian President Putin appears to be a big loser, as Ukraine will now try to integrate its economy into the EU. This will be a difficult business since Ukraine is near sovereign default. It’s not like the EU needs another weak sister to prop up — not with Greece looking for a third bailout. But Ukraine has the potential to be an important market for EU members, and IMF loans may be forthcoming if the country agrees to some market reforms.

Whatever you want to call it — a coup or peaceful transition — the last few hours have been among the most dramatic in Ukraine’s history.

Also read: 

White House Takes Credit for Ukraine Deal

Rick Moran is PJ Media's Chicago editor and Blog editor at The American Thinker. He is also host of the"RINO Hour of Power" on Blog Talk Radio. His own blog is Right Wing Nut House.

Comments are closed.

Top Rated Comments   
I fear this sounds more like the eve of a full-blown civil war than a transition. We now have a western government with a distinct western leader and supporters pitted against an eastern government with a distinct eastern leader and supporters. It isn't obvious to me that either has the upper hand.
22 weeks ago
22 weeks ago Link To Comment
Whatever actions Putin might take he'll be cooling his heels until the Olympics are done. When the world has turned it's collective attention elsewhere the question remains - will Putin roll the tanks into Kiev? I think he might. O'Zero hasn't the balls to tell him no. And the EU? You can't neuter the already neutered.

22 weeks ago
22 weeks ago Link To Comment
As Ledeen said yesterday...these are stormy days...
Wow

Looky Mr. Obama, Freedom is winning ! So sorry for you...

:) :) :)

22 weeks ago
22 weeks ago Link To Comment
All Comments   (32)
All Comments   (32)
Sort: Newest Oldest Top Rated
I don't see any benefit to getting involved. As someone has said, dismember the country and let the Europeans cover the bills. With Europe spending 2% or less on defense, they should have the wherewithal to integrate a rump Ukraine into Europe.
22 weeks ago
22 weeks ago Link To Comment
22 weeks ago
22 weeks ago Link To Comment
I have yet to see a coherent description of the current Ukrainian economy. What do they do for a living there? Wikipedia says grain, aerospace, and industrial equipment. I know they have coal mines also.
22 weeks ago
22 weeks ago Link To Comment
Dead bodies lying around the main square; chaos throughout the land. Sounds like the work of the American State Department and Hillary's girls. Destruction, chaos and dead bodies typical work for the New American State. How many CIA operatives and NSA spies were involved in the overthrow of another country?
22 weeks ago
22 weeks ago Link To Comment
Well, there appear to be hundreds of thousands of CIA operatives and NSA spies in Ukraine. I'll have to ask my relatives over there how much the US is paying them.

However, there is some truth in what you say. The Ukrainians are pawns in a chess game, with shady EU puppet masters facing off against Vlad and his merry band of Russian oligarchs. In a sense, there are no "good guys", and there is a real danger that we're just looking at which victor gets to rape the country further. But I hope for the best.
22 weeks ago
22 weeks ago Link To Comment
You appear to ascribe capabilities to Hillary Clinton that she does not have. Nor do any of the career hacks who work in the Department of State, which, after all, she does not run any more.

The dead in Ukraine are dead because of Russian (Putin) machination, as per usual. Lying about it in a loud teary voice doesn't change the facts on the ground.
22 weeks ago
22 weeks ago Link To Comment
People who stand in the way of Putin, tend to wind up dead.

Then again...so did Vince Foster and Ambassador Stevens, so maybe it's nothing to worry about.
22 weeks ago
22 weeks ago Link To Comment
FREEDOM from the left and FREEDOM from the oppressive Big Business right, EVERYWHERE!!! Let FREEDOM ring!
22 weeks ago
22 weeks ago Link To Comment
A sprawling forested estate of graceful waterways and summer houses - half the size of Monaco but just one hour's drive from Kiev - stands as a symbol of the folly of Ukraine's fugitive president.

Even the most cynical Ukrainians, who on Saturday streamed to see Viktor Yanukovich's luxury estate, rubbed their eyes in disbelief when they were confronted by the scale of the opulence he built around him and kept secret from the outside world.

There were Australian and African ostriches, stretching their legs. There were hares darting around people's feet - clearly unused to large numbers.

Deer and billy goats - their cages neatly labelled - were hunkered down, slightly alarmed at the numbers of sudden visitors.

All this in a country where the average salary is less than $500 a month.

Yanukovich, 63, who fled into hiding on Saturday as the turmoil of three months confrontation with his people caught up with him, relaxed at weekends in luxury behind high walls patrolled by scores of security guards.

When the dream ended and Yanukovich's staff fled the Gatsby-like mansion in the early hours of Saturday, the Kiev protest movement that had opposed him invited Ukrainians to go to see the opulence Yanukovich lived in.

As they poured in their thousands, by foot and by car, onto the 140-hectare grounds for a first glimpse at a luxury they could only suspect, Ukrainians gawped in wonderment at the fairytale surroundings.

What they saw reflected more the inflated dreams of a Middle East potentate - with all the attendant obsessions with security - rather than a rough-hewn man from the gritty eastern Ukraine who got to the top the hard way.

The incongruous presence of ostriches - labels said they were from Australia, Africa and South America - suggested a weakness for 'nouveau riche' status symbols.
22 weeks ago
22 weeks ago Link To Comment
Stalin and the people in his Politburo also lived quite well. I have a book with many photographs of the opulent mansions Stalin had at his disposal. Most had been expropriated from the capitalists who left after Lenin overthrew the Provisional Government in 1917 via his coup. The Politburo drove luxurious Packard limousines in the 1930s while ordinary Soviet citizens weren't able to own even really bad domestically-made personal cars until the 1960s.

In fact, the special treatment of the upper ranks of the Communist Party has been a key feature of ALL Communist parties I've ever studied, including the Soviet Union, China, and East Germany. A couple of years ago, Forbes magazine indicated that Fidel Castro was also a very wealthy man. For all their claims to be working for the working man, these Communists live suspiciously like the most successful capitalists. The difference of course is that they didn't earn their wealth, they expropriated it from others at gunpoint.....
22 weeks ago
22 weeks ago Link To Comment
Don't begrudge him a few toys. After all, Obama uses HIS treasury as a pocket book too.
22 weeks ago
22 weeks ago Link To Comment
I fear this sounds more like the eve of a full-blown civil war than a transition. We now have a western government with a distinct western leader and supporters pitted against an eastern government with a distinct eastern leader and supporters. It isn't obvious to me that either has the upper hand.
22 weeks ago
22 weeks ago Link To Comment
Putin is a hard-headed realist who loves Russia - not another Uncle Joe. All will be well.
22 weeks ago
22 weeks ago Link To Comment
Euromaidanpr
Viktor Yanukovych is now in Kharkiv and it is possible that he will be soon arrested there. The current situation is quite bad for Yanukovych since no state is ready to welcome him. Meanwhile, he hasn’t received any guarantees from Putin.

Censor.net reports that Yanukovych went to Kharkiv late at night yesterday, February 22, in order to proclaim the South-East Ukrainian Autonomous Republic. Before that he made a phone call to Putin asking for the guarantees, however, the Russian President refused.

In his statement made on Saturday, February 22, Yanukovych said that he considers the current developments in Ukraine to be the state coup d'état and compared them with the Nazi regime.

Meanwhile, at 7.40 p.m. (Kyiv time) tsn.ua reported that Yanukovych has just left Ukraine heading now to Russia.

Source: censor.net
22 weeks ago
22 weeks ago Link To Comment
I don't read Russsian. Do you have an English link?
22 weeks ago
22 weeks ago Link To Comment
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