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Sign "O" the Times

United States President Barack Obama delivers remarks after meeting with members of his national security team concerning ISIS. From left, Deputy Secretary of Defense Robert O. Work, Commander of U.S. Central Command Gen. Lloyd Austin, Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter, Commander of U.S. Africa Command Gen. David Rodriguez, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff U.S. Army General Martin Dempsey and Commander of U.S. Special Operations Command Gen. Joseph L. Votel. President Obama recieves an update on ISIS at the Pentagon, Arlington, Virginia, America - 06 Jul 2015 (Rex Features via AP Images)

United States President Barack Obama delivers remarks after meeting with members of his national security team concerning ISIS. From left, Deputy Secretary of Defense Robert O. Work, Commander of U.S. Central Command Gen. Lloyd Austin, Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter, Commander of U.S. Africa Command Gen. David Rodriguez, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff U.S. Army General Martin Dempsey and Commander of U.S. Special Operations Command Gen. Joseph L. Votel. President Obama recieves an update on ISIS at the Pentagon, Arlington, Virginia, America – 06 Jul 2015 (Rex Features via AP Images)

Special Forces morale is plummeting as White House rules interfere with their mission and unjustly ends promising careers:

In recent months, the Army has disciplined, admonished and ended the careers of a number of Green Berets for actions that the soldiers themselves believe were part of combating an evil enemy. Pristine standards for fighting the Taliban and al Qaeda are not achievable, some in the community say.

“There is certainly a belief that upper echelons of leadership have morphed into political positions, and leaders are a lot less willing to risk their own career to support their soldiers,” Danny Quinn, a former Green Beret team leader and West Point graduate, told The Washington Times.

Examples abound.

Read the whole thing.