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CNN Adopts Far-Left 'Hate List' From Terror-Linked Organization

A map of organizations across the United States which the Southern Poverty Law Center considers "hate groups."

On Thursday, CNN posted and fully endorsed a "hate map" published by the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), an organization whose "hate" labeling inspired at least one terrorist attack. The SPLC rightly condemns various white nationalist groups like the Ku Klux Klan, but its "hate map" also includes organizations with which it merely disagrees politically. As such, it is a deceptive propaganda tool against the Right and Christians.

"917. That's the number of hate groups operating in the US, according to data from the Southern Poverty Law Center," CNN's Dakin Andone reported. "The Alabama-based nonprofit activist group tracks civil rights and hate crimes and defines a hate group as an organization with 'beliefs and practices that attack or malign an entire class of people, typically for their immutable characteristics.'"

CNN also included a map marking where every "hate group" exists across America. The outlet also tweeted a picture of the map to its 37 million followers.

In the wake of the Charlottesville violence, companies like Apple have sought to help the SPLC because it does mark white supremacist groups as "hate groups." The problem is, it doesn't stop there.

CNN's Andone added, "Some are classified as anti-LGBT groups, and some are black separatists, who don't believe in interracial marriage and want a nation only for black people, according to the group." So Christian organizations that seek to foster traditional sexual morality are compared to the KKK and black separatists?

To his credit, the CNN reporter also admitted that "some critics of the SPLC say the group's activism biases how it categorizes certain groups." Andone brushed aside such criticism, however, on the basis that "since the FBI doesn't keep track of domestic hate groups, the SPLC's tally is the widely accepted one."

It is indeed widely accepted — so widely accepted, that the very list CNN condones and posts for 31 million viewers actually inspired a terror attack in 2012, and may have inspired the shooting of Rep. Steve Scalise (R-La.).

In the summer of 2012, a man named Floyd Lee Corkins III broke into the Family Research Council (FRC), armed with a semi-automatic pistol and Chick-Fil-A chicken sandwiches, aiming to kill every person in the building. In February 2013, Corkins pled guilty to committing an act of terrorism and was sentenced to 25 years in prison.

Where did Corkins get the motivation and the address to attack the FRC? In his own words, the convicted terrorist told the FBI that he targeted this Christian group because it was listed as an "anti-gay group" on the SPLC website. Here's the video of that interaction.