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CNN to Jon Ossoff: 'When Are You Going to Marry' Your Girlfriend of 12 Years?

Jon Ossoff, the Democratic golden boy with a slight chance of winning the special election for Georgia's 6th Congressional District Tuesday evening, can't even vote for himself because he does not live in the district. But the reason why he doesn't is even more damning.

"I grew up in this district. I grew up in this community," Ossoff told CNN "New Day" host Alisyn Camerota. "No one knew there was going to be an election coming. I've been living with Alicia, my girlfriend of 12 years, down by Emory University where she's a full-time medical student. ... I want to support her in her career and do right by her."

Camerota shot back, "So when are you going to marry her?" In case Ossoff did not know, he's running for Congress in the deep-red state of Georgia, in a very red district. His lack of commitment to his girlfriend of over a decade might — just maybe — hurt him electorally in the Bible Belt, especially when his top two competitors, former Georgia Secretary of State Karen Handel and businessman Bob Gray, have been married for years. Gray has four children.

The CNN host also insisted on getting an answer as to whether or not Ossoff can vote for himself. "You don't live in the district in which you're running, so you will not be able to vote for yourself," Camerota said.

"I grew up in this district. I grew up in this community. It's my home," the Democrat insisted.

Ossoff leads in the polls for the Tuesday election, but it is a "jungle" primary, which means that multiple Republicans and Democrats will be running against one another. There are eleven Republicans and five Democrats running for the open seat vacated by Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Tom Price. Unless one candidate receives more than 50 percent of the vote on Tuesday, the race will go to a runoff.