State Dept. IG Asks for Clinton Foundation Records

Last fall, the State Department inspector general issued a subpoena to the Bill, Hillary and Chelsea Clinton Foundation for records related to the charity’s projects "that may have required approval from the federal government during Hillary Clinton’s term as secretary of state," the Washington Post reported yesterday.

The subpoena also asked for records related to longtime Clinton aide Huma Abedin, who was simultaneously employed by four different entities connected to the Clintons in 2012. For a period of six months, Abedin worked for the State Department, the Clinton Foundation, Clinton’s personal office, and a private consulting firm with ties to the Clintons, raising concerns about conflicts of interest. According to Fox News, multiple media reports over the past year "have raised questions about whether foundation donors used their contributions to seek influence with the State Department."

The Clinton presidential campaign has rejected such assertions. Meanwhile, questions about Abedin’s role and the foundation largely have been overshadowed by the controversy over Clinton’s use of a personal server and email system while secretary. That matter is under investigation by the FBI.

Today a federal judge added to Clinton's headaches, "dropping the hammer" on the State Department and giving them until the end of the month to release her 3,700 remaining work-related emails. The emails are to be released in four installments over the next three weeks with the first installment of 550 emails coming this weekend.  It's these last remaining emails that will be the most problematic for Hillary, according to Fox News' Catherine Herridge.

"From what I know from my reporting, some of these emails contain intelligence from multiple agencies. Each agency must review the piece of paper and determine the classification and it's hard to imagine a scenario where there aren't more emails deemed classified and there aren't more emails withheld from public release," Herridge told Greta Van Susteren Thursday evening.

Susteren asked Herridge about the 30,000 supposedly personal emails that Clinton had deleted.

"Have they been recovered?" Greta asked. "Because if they are not personal, I think that's a big problem."

"You are right on the money with that," Herridge answered. "Our reporting is that a lot of that material on that server was recovered, but I do not know if any of them were deemed to be government business and she ran afoul by deleting them."