Sister of Fallen Benghazi Hero: Hillary's Not Being Truthful

Hillary Clinton smiles.

The still-heartbroken sister of fallen
 Benghazi hero Glen Doherty struck back at Hillary Clinton in an interview with the Boston Herald yesterday, saying the Democrat frontrunner is being "untruthful" about the 2012 terrorist attack in which Doherty and three other Americans died.

"She knows that she knew what happened that day and she wasn’t truthful,” Kate Quigley said on Boston Herald Radio’s “Morning Meeting” show yesterday. “This is a woman that will do and say anything to get what she wants. I have very little respect for her."

On ABC News' This Week Sunday, Clinton denied that she told the Benghazi families that a YouTube video was to blame for the terrorist attack that killed four Americans. However, at the Andrews Air Force Base ceremony honoring the dead on September 14, 2012, Clinton said in her public remarks that “we’ve seen rage and violence directed at American embassies over an awful Internet video that we had nothing to do with.”

Four different relatives of three of the Benghazi victims claim that she also mentioned protests over the YouTube video, "Innocence of Muslims," when she met with them privately at the Andrews Air Force base. Emails released in October prove that Hillary knew on the night of the attacks that the carnage was the result of a terrorist attack -- not a spontaneous demonstration over an offensive video.

Quigley told the Boston Herald that she will "never ever forget" what Hillary Clinton said to her that day about the Libyan people. She didn't go into it during the Boston Herald interview, but when she appeared on CNN in October, Quigley stated that Clinton had told her she should "feel sorry for the Libyan people because they’re uneducated, and that breeds fear, which breeds violence, and leads to a protest. And I remember thinking at the time, ‘Wow, how selfish of me. I’ve never really thought about the Libyan people. I’ve been so consumed with my own grief and loss and concern,’ and when I think back now to that day and what she knew, you know, it shows me a lot about her character that she would choose, in that moment to basically perpetuate what she knew was untrue.” Quigley said the comments seemed very strange to her at the time.

Quigley told the Boston Herald, "I know what she said to me and she can say all day long that she didn't say it.... That’s her cross to bear.”