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Did You Fall for This 'Fake News' Bogus Baby Wipe Recall?

(Shutterstock)

In today’s world of “fake news” circulating the webosphere, parents and grandparents now need to add another checkpoint when assessing articles shared on social media: checking the date.

You may have seen this story popping up on your news feed warning of a recall of ten different brands of baby wipes. As a mom who uses wipes on a daily basis, the article caught my attention and prompted a click.

The article, published in January of 2017, tells of a bacteria that has been found in these ten brands of wipes. The discovery occurred when the manufacturer, Nutek Disposables, Inc., received “a small number of complaints” concerning an “odor and discoloration.” Upon further testing, the bacteria Burkholderia cepacia (B. Cepacia) was discovered in some of their products.

B. Cepacia is a “species of antibiotic-resistant bacteria frequently found in soil and water, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).” It is particularly dangerous for people "with weakened immune systems or chronic lung disease, especially cystic fibrosis patients." When this bacteria contributes to pulmonary infections it can cause "accelerated decline in lung functions and can induce ‘cepacia syndrome,’ a progressive form of pneumonia that can be fatal and untreatable."

As you can imagine, my mother’s heart began to panic at this description of a fatal disease my child could contract simply from having his bum wiped. The problem with this 2017 news report is that it is old news—very old news, in fact.