News & Politics

Ousted Mo. Gov. Eric Greitens Says He Was Targeted in Trump-Like Probe by Partisan Soros-Funded Prosecutor

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens speaks to a small group of supporters announcing the release of funds for the state's biodiesel program May 17, 2018, in Jefferson City, Mo. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

It’s obvious to see now after witnessing the specious and politically manufactured attacks on Donald Trump and Brett Kavanaugh, but at the same time that was going on–2018–then-Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens—a retired Navy SEAL badass whose first political office was governor—had admitted to an affair. It was easy to think that maybe he was out ‘over his skis’ and had gotten caught up in some tawdry affair.

But Greitens had already confessed his affair with his hairdresser to his wife and family. He’d already come clean, but the new chief prosecutor, one of leftist billionaire George Soros’s hand-picked candidates in his District Attorney Project, alleged that Greitens had committed a felony with his affair. How? Kim Gardner alleged in her tissue-thin, one-paragraph indictment, void of any evidence, that Greiten committed a felony invasion of privacy for taking a boudoir photo of his mistress and threatening to release it if she talked about her affair.

Cue the #MeToo outrage.

Greitens, who was in office two years, was hounded out. The voters who thought they were getting a door-kicker who got things done, were instead getting an alleged felon. They were outraged and he resigned.

But fast-forward now, as John Solomon reports at his new website Just the News (see him talk about his experience below), there was never any evidence of that compromising photo. Never any evidence of threats made by the governor. Moreover, the private investigator hired to do the investigation–completely contrary to how the office worked–was indicted for lying and tampering with evidence. Gardner allegedly was in on what looks to be a phony investigation done for political effect, though she hasn’t been indicted by the special prosecutor now looking into the case.

Solomon reported that this month Greitens was cleared of campaign finance charges, charges that were ladled on at “the height of the scandal” after an ethics investigation into the prosecutors:

Earlier this month, the Missouri Ethics Commission cleared Greitens of charges lodged against him during the height of the scandal that he had violated campaign finance laws. The commission “found no evidence of any wrongdoing on the part of Eric Greitens” but fined his campaign for two reporting violations.

It also turns out that the hairdresser, Katrina Sneed, never independently came forward to lodge a complaint against Greitens. Indeed, she was asked by prosecutors to come forward to claim the allegation.

And it appears that investigators put words into Sneed’s mouth. While they were alleging the evidence of a nasty photo, it turns out that Sneed wasn’t sure there was ever a photo taken. She told them she could have dreamed it. Later she testified under oath that there was never a photo.

The prosecutor’s office also said there was no video recording of the conversation between Sneed and the indicted investigator. But there was. Gardner denies any wrongdoing.

The voters of Missouri had their votes for Greitens voided, nullified and erased by allegedly unscrupulous prosecutors bringing phony charges to undo the results of an election. That’s sure the way Greitens sees it. And he sees something more, a pattern:

“It’s good to have been exonerated. I’m glad that the truth is coming out,” Greitens told Just the News, comparing his plight to that of Trump during the Russia collusion case. “All Americans need to know that the left and deep state insiders engaged in a criminal effort to overturn the 2016 election.”

As our colleague, Glenn Reynolds, put it at Instapundit, vestiges of fair treatment at the prosecutor’s office have been erased, the torpedos are circling and “We need to make examples of these political prosecutions. Jail time all around.”

By all means, go to Just the News and see all the documents showing lying by the investigator.

The Greitens case isn’t the only controversy impacting Gardner: More than 70 prosecutors in her office have been fired or forced to quit and dozens of St. Louis police officers have been banned from testifying in court. She also was fined more than $60,000 for campaign finance violations. After signing a plea deal, Gardner issued a statement blaming clerical errors for the campaign violations and accusing a “Republican political operative” for filing the complaint against her.

No matter which side prevails in the coming months, the investigators who went after Greitens are clearly now the investigated, much like the FBI and DOJ officials who opened the Trump-Russia collusion probe during the 2016 election find themselves in hot water in Washington under Attorney General William Barr.

Earlier this month, the Missouri Ethics Commission cleared Greitens of charges lodged against him during the height of the scandal that he had violated campaign finance laws. The commission “found no evidence of any wrongdoing on the part of Eric Greitens” but fined his campaign for two reporting violations.

“It’s good to have been exonerated. I’m glad that the truth is coming out,” Greitens told Just the News, comparing his plight to that of Trump during the Russia collusion case. “All Americans need to know that the left and deep state insiders engaged in a criminal effort to overturn the 2016 election.”

Soros, one of the largest liberal benefactors in history, donated $630,000 that year to a political action committee called Safety and Justice Committee. That super PAC in turn donated more than $204,000 as an in-kind donation to Gardner’s election. Soros’ support accounted for about two-thirds of her total campaign donations of nearly $300,000, according to a post-election filing with the Missouri Ethics Commission. Gardner’s platform of criminal justice reform to help minorities proved a nice fit for Team Soros.