News & Politics

Sarah Sanders Blasts Judge's Decision to Block Trump's 'Remain in Mexico' Policy: 'Sad'

Migrants wait in line to get their names on a waiting list to apply for asylum in the United States, at the border. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

A federal judge has blocked the administration’s “remain in Mexico” policy that forces some migrants seeking asylum to wait in Mexico until their court hearing.

A preliminary injunction was issued by Richard Seeborg of the Northern District of California and will go into effect April 12.

CNN:

The Migrant Protection Protocols program, informally known as “Remain in Mexico,” was initially rolled out at the San Ysidro port of entry in January. Nielsen recently ordered that the policy be expanded along the southern border in an attempt to stem the flow of migrants to the border. Up to 400 people have been returned to Mexico under the policy, according to a DHS official.

The Migrant Protection Protocols program, informally known as “Remain in Mexico,” was initially rolled out at the San Ysidro port of entry in January. Nielsen recently ordered that the policy be expanded along the southern border in an attempt to stem the flow of migrants to the border. Up to 400 people have been returned to Mexico under the policy, according to a DHS official.

The “remain in Mexico” policy was negotiated with the Mexican government. Perhaps the judge wants to negotiate for the Mexicans as well.

Needless to say, the White House was miffed. Donald Trump called the ruling a “disgrace” and Sarah Sanders didn’t mince any words in criticizing the decision.

In February, a coalition of immigrant advocacy groups asked a federal judge for a restraining order that would block the so-called Remain in Mexico policy.

Eleven migrants who are seeking asylum in the United States and were returned to Mexico under the policy are also plaintiffs in the case. If the ruling takes effect, the government will have two days to allow those 11 migrants into the US.

Some have already attended their first hearing in removal proceedings at the San Diego immigration court. The immigration hearings underway so far have underscored outstanding issues with the new program, including the challenge of obtaining legal representation while in another country and providing notification of court dates to an individual without a fixed address.

Once the asylum seekers are on American soil, they are pretty much gone. They get their court date and melt away after being released because there is no legal way to detain them.

This is exactly what the SPLC and “immigration advocacy” groups want. If Congress won’t fling open our borders for anyone to come in — and not even Democrats would vote for that — then they will seek allies in the federal courts to do what Congress and the president would never do.