News & Politics

Chicago to Allow Crime... If You Can Run Fast Enough

(AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

On Tuesday, the Chicago Police Department announced a change in its foot-chase policy in which officers can no longer pursue criminals on foot under certain conditions.

While the CPD hasn’t determined an effective date, the new policy details what rules constitute the necessity of a foot chase. The policy states that the “Department’s highest priority is the sanctity of all human life”; however, the policy seems to have the safety of the criminal chiefly in mind.

The policy lists a number of prohibitions for foot chases and encourages members of the department to discontinue pursuit under many circumstances, including if the suspect is carrying a firearm (which seems like a prime reason to pursue the suspect), if the suspect enters a building or some type of structure (so technically he can run home?), or if officers know the identity of the suspect (or in other words, “Eh, I’ll catch you later.”), among other reasons.

If members of the department are going to engage in pursuit on foot, then they will first have to establish reasonable suspicion that a felony is being committed or has been committed, but the policy prohibits a foot chase for minor crimes.

The absurdity of this policy has drawn criticism on Twitter, including from James Woods, who tweeted, “The policy, which was introduced Tuesday, also encourages cops to ‘consider alternatives’ to pursuing someone who ‘is visibly armed with a firearm. But you, the law-abiding citizen, are on your own, unarmed, defenseless, and on your knees.”

The leftist utopia is quite visible in the bluest of cities. In the state of California, crime is practically legal. Shoplifting, for example, is considered a misdemeanor as long as it is less than $950, according to the Hoover Institution.

Chicago has strict gun laws unless you are a criminal. Then your safety needs to be protected. Chicago is currently one of the most dangerous cities to live in the U.S., according to World Population Review.