News & Politics

Kabul University Shuts Down as Taliban Ban Women

AP Photo/Khwaja Tawfiq Sediqi

All women have been banned from studying or teaching in any public university in Afghanistan, and the students from Kabul University have been sent home, according to the Washington Post.

Kabul University, which is normally very active, was quiet today. Classes were suspended and all students, male and female, were sent home until the two genders can be segregated.

In a message to the Washington Post, Taliban official Bilal Karimi stated that they are “working on a comprehensive plan to ensure a peaceful environment for female students.” He said that when  this is done “[women] would be allowed to continue their education.”

Ironically, the women in Afghanistan were already in a generally “peaceful environment” until the Taliban seized power after Biden pulled out U.S. troops.

The Taliban’s new minister of higher education, Abdul Baqi Haqqani, stated that Afghanistan under the Taliban “will not allow boys and girls to study together.” Haqqani said that the country “will not allow coeducation,” according to The Hill.

Not to worry. Haqqani assured the public that things will not be the way they were the last time the Taliban was in charge 20 years ago, saying, “We will start building on what’s today.”

So far, they are off to bad start.

Not only are women not allowed to study, but they are not even allowed to work at the university “until an Islamic environment is created,” said the school’s new Taliban-appointed chancellor Mohammad Ashraf Ghairat.

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“A bad misunderstanding of my words by the New York Times. I haven’t said that we will never allow women to attend universities or go to work, I meant that until we create an Islamic environment, women will have to stay at home. We work hard to create safe Islamic environment soon,” Ghairat  tweeted.

What exactly constitutes an “Islamic environment” for Ghairat? That has yet to be defined by the school’s new chancellor; however, if history serves as an indicator, it cannot be good news. Just a few weeks ago, Taliban soldiers were recorded flogging and even executing women in the streets for protesting.

Public floggings and executions, underage marriages, a ban on education–it does not take a genius to guess what the future holds in Taliban-controlled Afghanistan. These are just some of the repercussions of President Joe Biden’s so-called “success.”