News & Politics

The Rape of Germany

(AP Photo/Juergen Schwarz)

Women of Germany (and Europe): you can thank Angela Merkel for this:

At first, there was complete silence from officials. As rumors spread on social media, police had nothing to say about allegations of mass sexual assaults and other crimes carried out on New Year’s Eve in the German city of Cologne. It was only days later that officials reported that hundreds of women were victims of assault in Cologne, Hamburg and other German cities.

But numbers that are now emerging are likely to shock a country still coming to terms with what happened in Cologne more than half a year ago. According to a leaked police document, published by Germany’s Sueddeutsche Zeitung newspaper and broadcasters NDR and WDR, the previous estimates have to be dramatically revised — upward.

Authorities now think that on New Year’s Eve, more than 1,200 women were sexually assaulted in various German cities, including more than 600 in Cologne and about 400 in Hamburg. More than 2,000 men were allegedly involved, and 120 suspects — about half of them foreign nationals who had only recently arrived in Germany — have been identified.

You can also thank, in no particular order, a “feminist” ascendancy that has marginalized traditional masculinity, a weak quasi-socialist culture that has not had to provide for its own defense since the end of World War II, a declining birth rate that has pushed chancellor Merkel (herself childless and thus with no personal stake in the future) to import a million Muslims in the idiotic hope that they would provide both Germany’s future work force (this from a culture that cannot build a functioning flush toilet) and its heavily taxed taxpayers to keep the social safety net in place (good luck with that).

Officials have linked the sexual assaults to the influx of refugees. “There is a connection between the emergence of this phenomenon and the rapid migration in 2015,” Holger Münch, president of the German Federal Crime Police Office, told Sueddeutsche Zeitung. Many suspects had originally come to Germany from North African countries rather than Syria, officials said.

Next Page: The German Parliament’s sad, delayed response.

Germany’s Parliament passed a stricter sexual-assault law last week that will make it easier for courts to sentence those who facilitate or are involved in assaults. The new law will be based on the premise that “no means no,” meaning that sexual assault can be punished as rape if the offender ignores the “discernible contrary will” of the victim.

Naturally, the German Left is against it:

Halina Wawzyniak, a lawmaker from the Left Party, told The Washington Post last week that immigration issues and sexual-assault cases should not be linked, as refugees could end up facing a “double punishment” by being deported. “The debate used to be about ‘no means no’ — now all that is being talked about in social networks are foreigners again,” she said.

Why the Merkel government hasn’t fallen by now is a tribute to the passivity of the German people, which we and the Russians beat into them at the conclusion of the war. But in the coming confrontation with recrudescent Islam — whose goal really is world conquest, lest we forget — Germany is going to need to relocate its spine if it wants to survive with its national pride intact and its women unmolested, instead of taken as spoils of war in the Dar al-Harb.