News & Politics

Queen to Announce Voter ID Requirements in UK to Tackle Election Fraud

Toby Melville/Pool via AP

“Britons will have to show photo ID to vote in future general elections,” reports The Guardian. And the reason is obvious: to combat voter fraud.

The Queen is expected to formally announce the proposal in a speech on Tuesday.

Just like in the United States, this commonsense approach to fighting voter fraud is being met with accusations of racism from its opponents, who apparently think minorities are incapable of acquiring identification like everyone else.

That’s not all.

The voter ID requirement is one of a number of voting reform proposals, including one “which will also include a limit on the number of postal votes that can be handed in on behalf of others,” which is being justified by ministers “as a way to reduce the risk of electoral fraud.”

You don’t say?

“The changes would affect UK-wide and English elections,” the Guardian explains, though voters in Northern Ireland already have to show identification in order to vote.

Of course, U.S. civil rights groups aren’t happy with this idea and have “warned” Britons that such proposals could be used to disenfranchise voters who don’t have the required proof of identification.

What prompted this move by the UK? Could it be the disastrous 2020 presidential election, which is rife with accusations of voter fraud?

In March, a Michigan judge ruled that Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson, a Democrat, broke state law when she unilaterally changed election rules concerning absentee balloting in the 2020 election—legitimizing a key claim made by the Trump legal team in its challenges to the 2020 election. An audit of the vote in Maricopa County, Ariz., is currently underway.

Millions of voters don’t believe Joe Biden legitimately won the election. While commonsense reforms to strengthen election integrity should be a nonpartisan issue, sadly, it seems that can’t be the case. It’s nice to see the United Kingdom taking steps to ensure their elections are as secure as possible. Maybe one day the same thing can happen in the States.