News & Politics

Antifa Is Just Plain Fa

Antifa Counter-protesters prepare to clash with Patriot Prayer protesters during a rally in Portland, Ore., Saturday, Aug. 4, 2018. (AP Photo/John Rudoff)

I don’t like the alt-right, and the alt-right doesn’t like me. This arrangement suits me just fine. But I also reject any call for violence against them, or anybody else, for saying things I don’t like. Political violence isn’t just morally wrong, it’s actually counterproductive. Meeting hate with hate only produces more hate.

Here’s a perfect example of the proper way to counter the alt-right. A year ago, a white nationalist from Jacksonville, Fla., named Ken Parker went to the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville. There he met a filmmaker named Deeyah Khan, whose kindness to him when he was in a moment of need made him question his racist beliefs. A few months later, Parker befriended a pastor at a predominantly African-American church near his home. This past Easter, Parker stood up during the service and testified to the congregation about his past.

Aaron Franco and Morgan Radford, NBC News:

“I said I was a grand dragon of the KKK, and then the Klan wasn’t hateful enough for me, so I decided to become a Nazi — and a lot of them, their jaws about hit the floor and their eyes got real big,” Parker recalls. “But after the service, not a single one of them had anything negative to say. They’re all coming up and hugging me and shaking my hand, you know, building me up instead of tearing me down.”

The church embraced Parker. He was recently baptized there, and now he has this to say:

“I want to say I’m sorry. I do apologize,” Parker says when asked about all the people he has hurt along the way. “I know I’ve spread hate and discontent through this city immensely — probably made little kids scared to sleep in their own beds in their own neighborhoods.”

Imagine that. Human beings treating each other like human beings. Love overcoming hate. Sometimes it actually works!

How many other neo-Nazis are like Ken Parker? I have no idea. Not enough, that’s for sure. But even if he’s the only one on earth, he’s living proof that hate doesn’t have to be a permanent condition.

Now, what would’ve happened to Parker if the “anti-fascists” calling themselves Antifa had gotten their hands on him instead? What if, instead of appealing to his conscience and recognizing his human dignity, they just beat the crap out of him? Do you suppose that would’ve changed his mind? Or would it just convince him that he was right all along? Would their hate just strengthen his hate?

Here’s just a sampling of what Antifa got up to this weekend, in Charlottesville and Washington, D.C.:

And what about the horde of scary Nazis they were supposedly marching against?

That was it. That was the “rally.” Once again, a handful of Hitler cosplayers drove everyone out of their minds.

How do you suppose our moral, ethical, and intellectual betters in the media presented the people actually committing violence and spreading hate? You guessed it:

After watching Antifa in action over the past few years, and now seeing how the “anti-hate” movement operates, the prefix “anti-” now just means “more of the same.”

In other “anti-fascist” news, an Antifa college professor named Eric Clanton (allegedly) went to a rally in Berkeley last year and (allegedly) hit people on the head with a bike lock. He was just sentenced to three years of probation. Here’s some of Clanton’s handiwork (allegedly):

Do you think Clanton changed this kid’s mind by (allegedly) trying to change his skull into a soup bowl?

The mindset of these Antifa geniuses is perfectly encapsulated by an upcoming comic book called Always Punch Nazis. Apparently it’s intended as an instructional manual:

I don’t know of anybody, Nazi or anti-Nazi or otherwise, whose mind has ever been changed by a punch in the face. It’s never shown a guy like Ken Parker the error of his ways. That’s because violent rhetoric like this is just virtue signaling. It’s a way for liberals and leftists to remind all the other members of their chosen group that they still belong. “Hey guys, we’re just like the heroes on Normandy Beach. Yay!”

You can hate anybody you want, for any reason you want. It’s a free country. But violence isn’t going to make them see things your way. It might make you feel better, sure. But if all you care about is satisfying your rage, you should stop pretending to be “anti-hate.”

Antifa is just plain fa.