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EU Scrooges Wind Up With Eggnog on Their Faces After Trying to Ban the Word 'Christmas'

AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Every year we’re told there’s no war on Christmas. “Nobody’s trying to ban Christmas,” they say. “‘Happy Holidays’ is just meant to include everybody.”

Most people probably don’t have an issue with “Happy Holidays.” It’s the other attempts to squeeze out the word “Christmas” that bother people: things like commercials that start with “This Holiday …” or phrases like “holiday cards,” “holiday parties,” and “holiday music.”

I wonder what those “no war on Christmas” types think about what the European Union tried to do earlier this week.

In the ongoing efforts to solve the real problems going on in the world, the EU’s Commissioner for Equality, Helena Dalli, issued a memo on inclusive communication. The guide sought to “reflect diversity” and combat “stereotypes deeply rooted in individual and collective behaviour.”

It’s full of the typical far-left ridiculousness, like replacing “Ladies and gentlemen” with “Dear colleagues” and not assuming someone’s gender. Also, referring to “sending humans to Mars” instead of the “colonization of Mars.” You know, hard-hitting stuff like that.

Buried in the memo is something particularly insidious: a ban on anything Christian.

The Express explains that the memo:

…considered that referring to elements of Christian culture is “assuming that everyone is Christian”.

The report, therefore, recommended that references to Christmas be removed and that the term “holiday” be used instead.

Christian names such as Mary or John were also in line to be banned.

So not only did the EU want Europeans to run around speaking like awkward people in “holiday” shopping commercials, but names with Christian and biblical origins are off-limits? My name literally means “follower of Christ.” So if I traveled to Europe, would I have to go by something completely different so as not to offend non-Christians? It’s ridiculous.

The guide went over like a turd in a wassail bowl with some conservative Members of the European Parliament (MEP). One group of MEPs lashed out in a statement:

“In the era of susceptibility, even calling things by your name or wishing a Merry Christmas has become a discriminatory attitude, to be pursued in the name of the politically correct that so much appeals to the left and the majority that governs badly in the EU.

“They demand to change what they don’t like starting from language, imposing the Newspeak of single thought: a wrong and dangerous drift, which more and more often leads to the extremism of cancel culture and the demolition of symbols of history, with all due respect for tolerance, dialogue and respect.

“It is worrying that this way of reasoning is adopted by the European institutions: we would like Europe to use citizens’ money better, to resolve much more concrete and urgent issues. We will not become accomplices: we will continue to defend the Judeo-Christian values of Europe and the sacrosanct freedom of expression of citizens.”

The Commissioner of the EU withdrew the guidelines after multiple complaints. “It is not a mature document and does not meet to our quality standards,” said EU Commissioner Ursula von der Leyen. “So I withdraw it and we will work on this document again.”

Even the pope thought the memo was a bridge too far. The Vatican News reported the pontiff’s remarks:

You refer to the European Union document on Christmas… this is an anachronism. In history many, many dictatorships have tried to do so. Think of Napoleon: from there… Think of the Nazi dictatorship, the communist one… it is a fashion of a watered-down secularism, distilled water… But this is something that throughout hasn’t worked.

When you’ve lost Pope Francis, chances are you’ve gone way too far to the left.

So the next time someone tries to deny there’s a war on Christmas, introduce them to Helene Dalli and her attempt to forbid the word Christmas in Europe. And remind them that Dalli isn’t alone.