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FED UP: Inside the Chicago Police Shortage

AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast

Crime is soaring across America, and Chicago remains the epicenter.

A major reason could be that nation’s third-largest city lacks enough uniformed officers to patrol its dangerous streets.

Black Lives Matter activists, anti-police Democrats, and rogue prosecutors who won’t do their jobs may not fear this but normal Americans — who continue to flee urban cesspools — do.

And to make matters worse, the Windy City is struggling to find enough qualified applicants to enroll in the police academy to replenish the ranks. Currently, fewer than 100 people are at the academy. But usually only half finish the entire program, pass background checks, and finally take their oath.

“Back in the day, an agency like ours would get over 2,000 applicants per month,” a long-time Chicago police officer, who recently transferred out, told PJ Media Tuesday. “Now departments are literally competing with each other for qualified applicants. The hiring process, which used to take nearly a year, now only takes two or three months, but it’s just as thorough.”

As retirements in 2021 could eclipse records, Chicago’s CBS affiliate reported Monday afternoon that the manpower situation may get even more dire.

“Chicago police officers aren’t only retiring in record numbers, many are leaving the big city department for smaller ones,” reporter Dana Koslov wrote. “It’s contributing to an officer shortage that many city leaders believe will only get worse before it gets better.”

Reasons include too much mandatory overtime, canceled days off, low pay considering Chicago’s high cost of living, and lack of respect and support from city leaders.

City Hall claims that Chicago expects to be short nearly 1,000 police officers by the end of the year, but since left-wing pressure caused budget slashing and the elimination of more than 600 police positions already this year, it’s really a 1,600 officer shortfall.

If not retiring, police officers often seek work in suburban or rural areas, where they are needed and respected.

“I left largely due to politics, went to an agency an hour north, and took a large pay cut in pay, but it was worth it,” the officer told PJ Media. “I grew tired of not being unable to enforce the law, being told to let protestors breach security and destroy property, or not being permitted to respond to calls involving mentally ill people, even if they are threatening to kill people. Despite the cut in pay, and having to spend the summer away from family while attending a new academy, I haven’t regretted my decision to leave for even a second.”

Meanwhile, thanks to years of left-wing bigots in Chicago and elsewhere demanding the city “abolish the police,” the violent gangs and criminal thugs roam free, and vulnerable residents are afraid to drive or walk the streets.

 

Related: Chicago Police Officer Shot Dead on a Savage Night of Violence