German Homeschooling Family Can Stay in U.S.

download (17)

Yesterday the prospects looked grim for the Romeikes, the German homeschooling family who had fled Germany's oppressive education laws that would have forced the the children to attend government-approved schools in violation of the family's Christian beliefs. The family risked losing custody of their children and even jail time in their home country if they refused to cooperate with German education mandates. The family sought asylum in the United States, hoping to educate their children in peace without government persecution. The Romeikes, their lawyers, and their supporters were disappointed yesterday when the Supreme Court declined to review their case. Michael Farris, a member of the family's legal team, shared on Facebook:

This is extremely disappointing. We have some possibilities in Congress, but there are no guarantees. Although this is the end of the normal legal battles, we are not giving up. If 12 million people can live here illegally, then surely there is a way to find a place for this one family.

But this afternoon, we have a surprise announcement from Farris:

BREAKING NEWS!!! The Romeikes can stay!!!

Today, a Supervisor with the Department of Homeland Security called a member of our legal team to inform us that the Romeike family has been granted "indefinite deferred status". This means that the Romeikes can stay in the United States permanently (unless they are convicted of a crime, etc.).

This is an incredible victory that can only be credited to our Almighty God.

We also want to thank those of who spoke up on this issue--including that long ago White House petition. We believe that the public outcry made this possible while God delivered the victory.

This is an amazing turnaround in 24 hours. Praise the Lord.

Proverbs 21: 1 "The king's heart is like a stream of water directed by the Lord, He guides it wherever He pleases."

The United States Supreme Court decided last month to consider whether to hear Romeike v. Holder after the family's legal team filed an appeal in October. It first came up for consideration in November, but was delayed when the Court ordered U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder to respond in writing to the family's petition.

A day after the Supreme Court declined to review the case, someone in the incomprehensible American chain of command decided that the Romeikes will not be deported. For now.

We join Farris and the Romeikes in celebrating this great news!