Compassion and Idiot Compassion

Sally LPF 110908

About eight years ago, I had to take my 18 year old Siamese, Vashti, to the vet for what I knew was her last time. She had lymphoma, and I'd been taking care of her as she failed slowly, until finally I was feeding her baby food with an irrigation syringe. Still, she'd always seemed grateful; she purred, however faintly, when I petted her, and she woulld sleep for hours on her special sheepskin rug, which I kept in my lap. But one morning I looked at her, and I heard her say, as clearly as if she'd spoken in words, that she was ready. So we went to the vet, and I held her, and as the vet was putting the needle into her vein, she died peacefully, before the vet even gave the injection.

Afterward, there were people who scolded me for waiting so long; and there were people, New Age hipsters, who said that as a Buddhist I should not have taken her to the vet, shouldn't have participated in killing another sentient being. And I wondered myself if I'd waited too long, out of selfishness -- but Vashti wasn't just my cat, she was like my familiar, and you could make a good case that she'd been the only really successful relationship with a female of any species I'd ever had.

In any case, I was no longer uncertain after she'd died, because I was sure that I'd done as Vashti had wanted.

So last week we talked about metta, "good will" or "lovingkindness", one of the virtues exhibited by the Buddha that we try to learn to recognize in ourselves through metta practice. If you'll remember, in metta practice, you try to invoke that feeling of metta in yourself, and then direct it toward yourself and toward others, even people toward whom you feel hatred and anger.

Metta has another virtue, karuna or "compassion", with which it is paired. Metta is wishing good to others; karuna is understanding the suffering of others. Buddha, when he was Enlightened, could have chosen simply to reside in nirvana, but because of his feelings of metta and karuna chose to teach the Way of Liberation instead. The two things together are really the basis of Buddhist notions of morals: your good will to others goes along with your recognition that the other person is really, at heart, another person like yourself, and so you try to avoid causing suffering and try to help them also avoid suffering.