Tomato Buddha

It really is all tomatoes all the time this week in the Martin household, so I thought I'd make it a trifecta.


No, I don't think Siddhartha used a tomato timer, but I've begun to see a similarity among several of the things I do as practices: Julia Cameron's Morning Pages, the Pomodoro Technique as I use it, and zazen ("zah-zen"), the basic Buddhist meditation. But to explain that, I need to explain meditation, a column I've been meaning to write for a while.

Meditation is one of the basics, maybe the basic, components of Buddhist practice. It was the primary sort of meditation that Buddha taught his followers. In Japanese traditions, it's called shikantaza (只管打坐, Chinese "Zhǐguǎn dǎzuò") -- which simply means "nothing but sitting."

Okay, so it's "just sitting". Pretty easy, eh?

But wait, there's more!

The trick is, it's just sitting and nothing else. If you sit down someplace comfortable, turn off the radio and the TV, relax and let your eyes become unfocused, and just sit, pretty quickly one of two things will happen: either you'll find your mind consumed with thoughts, or you'll fall asleep. Maybe both. Your mind becomes consumed with one thought, and then another -- sexual fantasies, imagined arguments with whomever you might be arguing with, blog posts or comments or what you would have said if you'd have just thought of it then. You find yourself dwelling on thoughts, and so you're no longer just sitting.