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Muslim Brotherhood Incites More Terror Attacks Targeting Egypt's Coptic Christians

This past Friday I reported here at PJ Media on the attack just hours before the beginning of Ramadan on Coptic Christian pilgrims in Upper Egypt who were on their way to pray at a remote monastery in the desert.

Three vehicles full of gunmen opened fire on a bus with mostly women and children, killing 28. Only three children survived the attack.

This most recent attack, claimed Saturday by the Islamic State, comes amidst a rising tide of anti-Coptic incitement by leaders of the Muslim Brotherhood here and abroad.

Over the weekend Eric Trager of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy published an article at Foreign Policy identifying some of the recent examples of Muslim Brotherhood incitement and encouragement of terrorism targeting Coptic Christians.

Among the examples Trager discovered after Friday's attack on Coptic pilgrims was a Facebook post by Muslim Brotherhood youth leader Ahmed El-Moghir:

That comment has caught the attention of several Middle East media outlets. Here in the U.S., not so much.

This is far from the first time that El-Moghir has made the news:

After the dual Palm Sunday church bombings last month, Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood leader Wagdi Ghoneim justified the attacks that killed 49 because Coptic Christians had supported the Egyptian government.

State Department records going back to the late 1980s identify Ghoneim as a Muslim Brotherhood leader back to the time he was one of the group's most visible figures in Alexandria.