UK Christian Family Sues Church of England After School Endorses Transgenderism

Happy family gathered together, Nigel and Sally Rowe with their sons.

Nigel and Sally Rowe, Christian parents of two young boys, decided to pull their boys out of a local elementary school run by the Church of England after the school allowed a boy to attend school dressed as a girl. The Rowes said their boys were traumatized by the transgender child, and announced that they would sue the school for ignoring the rights of non-transgender kids and their parents.

When the oldest son was 6 years old, a boy in his class started coming to school as a girl, the Rowes explained in a video published by Christian Concern. The presence of a transgender child "was making him unwell and stressed and so we made the decision to withdraw him from school at the age of seven," Sally Rowe explained. After a year of homeschooling, "he has flourished and blossomed and been happy and well."

That was last year. This year, their youngest son is 6, and he too was disturbed because "a boy in his class is now coming to school sometimes as a girl and sometimes as a boy, as when the child decides," Nigel Rowe said.

"When our son told us about what happened in school, we were shocked, because we had no consultation about this, we were not aware of it, so the first thing we decided to do was to actually go into school and just talk with the teacher," the mother added. She recalled the school's response, "They kind of said, 'If a child wants to do that, we just have to accept it, and if we don't accept it, I could lose my job.'"

The father added, "We feel that it's not right to push this on children, to make out that there is no gender, because there's clearly a difference between boys and girls. I think if you ask most parents who have a son and a daughter, they'll say that there's a great difference between them in character, in traits of being male and female."

Nigel Rowe admitted that "we would be labeled as transphobic and all the other '-phobic' rhetoric that you hear but actually that's simply not the case. We see that there needs to be a different way of addressing this."

The Times reported that the "genderqueer" boy was invited to the Rowes' younger son's sixth birthday party in April; the party had a royal theme. Most boys dressed as knights, but he wore a blue velvet dress. Sally Rowe, who with her husband has played an active role in the school, said she had good relations with the dress-wearing boy's mother.

"The school environment is not the right place to be addressing this," the father argued.