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Another Prominent Christian Divorce Demonstrates Why We Need to Support Each Other

My parents celebrated their 45th wedding anniversary earlier this year. It hasn't always been easy, and I remember plenty of rough times between them, particularly during my late teens and early college years. Believe me, they're aware of what an accomplishment it is these days to have had such a long marriage, and they credit their commitment to Jesus as much as to each other.

It's heartbreaking to see how few marriages last a long time, and Christians aren't immune to divorce. (The stats that Christian marriages end in divorce as often as non-Christian marriages isn't quite true, but the numbers are still staggering.) Even well-known Christian "celebrities" can fall victim to divorce, as we've seen recently in the case of Lysa TerKeurst.

I'll admit that I don't know much about Lysa TerKeurst, but she's a prominent women's ministry author and speaker. I see women quote her on social media all the time, and she has a major following. She has written 20 books, been featured on cable and network news programming, and trained other Christian writers.

We're not talking about one of those folks you've never heard of, like the gay Christians the left-leaning media like to hold up as prominent names in the church. No, TerKeurst is a heavy hitter.

This month she published a blog post announcing that her marriage of nearly a quarter century has come to an end, due to her husband's infidelity. She writes:

I so wish we were sitting face-to-face so you could see my tears and hear the deep grief in my voice as I share this with you. My husband, life partner and father of my children, Art TerKeurst, has been repeatedly unfaithful to me with a woman he met online, bringing an end to our marriage of almost 25 years. For the past couple of years, his life has sadly been defined by his affection for this other woman and substance abuse. I don’t share this to harm or embarrass him, but to help explain why I have decided to separate from him and pursue a divorce. God has now revealed to me that I have done all I can do and I must release him to the Savior.

TerKeurst goes on to relay her story of intensive counseling, prayer and fasting, and the final realization that she had done all she could to save her marriage. She admits that she will take a break and undergo more counseling before resuming her ministry.

My heart goes out to TerKeurst, and she and her family are certainly deserving of our prayers. But there are lessons that the contemporary church can learn from her unfortunate story.