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4 Really Bad Reasons to Quit Your Church

During conversations about church growth, a pastor friend of mine likes to use the phrase "fishing in another man's goldfish bowl." By that, he means that the growth in membership in one church often runs parallel with the shrinking attendance in another church across town. People are simply church-hopping.

Reasons for leaving one church in order to attend another church vary, but there are a few that frequently pop up as reasons given to pastors for why "I believe that my family should find a new church." And almost all of the reasons, whether on this list or not, are a product of the sinful consumer mindset that many people bring with them into church. Below are four of what I believe are some of the most insidious and self-centered reasons for changing churches.

(For the record, there are legitimate reasons for someone to find a new church family—heretical teaching and unrepentant, obvious, and gross sin being allowed to continue within the church membership, to name two.)

4. I don't like the music

At the onset, let me answer one possible rejoinder—if the music in your church is not saturated in the Gospel, that may be a reason to find a new church, if only because it's probably a symptom of deeper theological issues in the church. But, let's be honest, when most people leave a church over music, it's not because the theology in the music is lacking; it's usually because they don't like the style of music. And that's not a legitimate reason to abandon your church family.

Wanting more drums (or less) in music is not an appropriate reason to break the covenant that you've made before God with your church family. When their kids or spouse listen to music that they don't like, people don't threaten to find a new family. Why should they treat the church family that the Holy Spirit has given them any differently? The answer, of course, is that they shouldn't.

We are called to show our love for each other by surrendering our rights to each other. If the leadership of your church has prayerfully concluded that a certain style of music best serves the majority of the church family, then praise God that the church leaders are attempting to serve God by serving the body and not the individuals. And then thank God for the opportunity to give Him glory by humbly surrendering your rights for the sake of your church family (but let God give Himself glory, resist the urge to brag about your humility).