Ed Driscoll

Hillary: You Didn't Build That

“If you have a job right now, don’t thank the company that hired you or the investors that created the company. According to Hillary Clinton, they didn’t build that. At first arguing that hiking the minimum wage would not cost jobs, the presumed Democratic presidential frontrunner then extended those thoughts in a very peculiar way,” Ed Morrissey writes at Hot Air:

At a Democratic rally in Massachusetts, Hillary Clinton’s attempt to attack “trickle-down economics,” resulted in a spectacularly odd statement. …

She went on to state that businesses and corporations are not the job creators of America. “Don’t let anybody tell you that it’s corporations and businesses that create jobs,” the former Secretary of State said.

Read the whole thing. “It’s not easy to get economics this wrong in such a short space of time,” Ed writes. “At some point, Democrats are going to have to come to grips with the fact that their front-runner is not just a lousy campaigner, but perhaps just as incompetent as the President from which they’re all attempting to run away at the moment.”

But note which direction they’re running, as Moe Lane writes in response to Hillary’s revealing gaffe:

The 2016 Democratic primaries are going to be fascinating.  The idea is to run away from an unpopular President, guys.  Towards the center.

In order to triangulate against a GOP Congress elected in part because of his disastrously leftwing first two years in office, Bill Clinton tacked to the center and the economy flourished. Rather than promise four more years of the same, Al Gore lost in 2000 because he admitted that he was planning to govern much further left than his boss, as Slate noted in November of 2000:

In the wake of a successful centrist presidency and the best economy in memory, Gore adopted an angry populism as the tone of his campaign. Michael Kinsley aptly characterized this stance as “You’ve never had it so good, and I’m mad as hell about it.” Egged on by populist advisers like Bob Shrum and Stanley Greenberg, Gore failed to assimilate the political implications of the social changes that have swept the country in the past decade. The new reality is not just that middle-class Americans think of themselves more as taxpayers than as the recipients of government programs. It’s that middle-class Americans actually own big chunks of the oil, insurance, and pharmaceutical companies that Gore was vilifying. Instead of running the first campaign of the new economy, he ran the last campaign of the New Deal.

Oh, would that that were true; Time magazine couldn’t wait to compare Obama to FDR in 2008, even before his administration tacked much further to the left than GWB. And now Hillary and Elizabeth Warren want to move even further left to distance themselves from Obama’s failed policies?

Why not just go full East Germany and call it a day?

(Oh right, that’s already in the works.)